Business

Acupuncturists open shop at Bayview

Dr. Teresa Bujacich and John Donald, with daughter Lucy, are open for business at Bayview Center. - Michaela Marx Wheatley
Dr. Teresa Bujacich and John Donald, with daughter Lucy, are open for business at Bayview Center.
— image credit: Michaela Marx Wheatley

A new health center in Bayview Center has opened its doors to a holistic approach to healing mind and body.

Owned by the husband and wife team of Dr. Teresa Bujacich and John Donald, the Whidbey Center for Natural Health is located adjacent to Curves in the old bank building on Howard Road.

“If I had to bring it down to one word, it’s balance,” Donald said. “Helping people understand where they are out of balance in their lives.”

Donald is a licensed acupuncturist with nine years of previous private practice experience and a three-year master’s degree in acupuncture.

At the Whidbey Center For Natural Health, he specializes in using acupuncture for the treatment of pain, including arthritis and injuries. He also has extensive experience helping patients who have been in auto accidents.

Donald said it’s worth giving alternative healing methods a try, and said he is a proponent of concurrent care, that acupuncture works effectively with other modalities, such as chiropractic, massage and physical therapy.

Bujacich is a naturopathic doctor and licensed acupuncturist with three years of private practice experience following her internship with the Bastyr Center for Natural Health in Seattle.

She said even patients that are suspicious of being poked with needles quickly realize it’s not as bad as it looks. In fact, not bad at all.

Her clinical focus is on patient education, dietary and lifestyle therapies and physical medicine — including the combination of manual therapy with acupuncture.

A former wilderness program leader for troubled youths, Bujacich enjoys coaching her patients through difficult health challenges and life changes. A big part of that is exercising.

“We like to make sure people are moving,” she said.

She said she enjoys acting as a health consultant, giving patients an overview of available options for care and referring patients to other providers as needed.

One of the interesting aspects of the new center is that it offers a large classroom space for wellness classes such as yoga, qi gong and tai chi.

Bujacich also plans to bring in guest teachers for specific health workshops and to personally coach small groups of patients through diet and lifestyle changes. Community members are being encouraged to inquire about hosting classes at the center, she said.

Donald will be offering a low-fee, group acupuncture clinic to allow patients from all economic walks of life to access this unique system of medicine. This special clinic is similar to many in China where multiple patients are treated simultaneously using points that do not require patients to disrobe.

In addition to their medical services, the intention of the Whidbey Center for Natural Health is to provide a community resource for people interested in taking a comprehensive approach to their well-being.

“Sustainability of self and community” is their theme.

Bujacich and Donald formerly owned a medical clinic in Issaquah and recently moved with their daughter Lucy, almost 2, to South Whidbey as a return to their rural roots.

“It’s an amazing island,” Bujacich said. “It’s far away from the maddening crowd.”

Both Bujacich and Donald can submit claims to most insurance plans for acupuncture and naturopathic medicine.

Contact the center at 331-7331 or visit their Website at www.whidbeynatural.com.

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