Business continues to bloom at Bayview Farm and Garden

Bayview Farm and Garden is getting a facelift. In order to address new needs, owner Maureen Murphy said a new building will be built to replace the gutter-connected greenhouses that were located in the center of the two—and-a-half-acre farm and garden center.

Randy Landon

Bayview Farm and Garden is getting a facelift.

In order to address new needs, owner Maureen Murphy said a new building will be built to replace the gutter-connected greenhouses that were located in the center of the two—and-a-half-acre farm and garden center.

The new building, which Murphy hopes will be built by February 2016, will contain house plants, a wild bird section that will include bird seed and feeders, and a feed department that caters to animals such as dogs, cats and chickens. The old greenhouses, built in 1993, were recently torn down because of leaks and rotting doors.

“It long ago quit serving our needs,” Murphy said. “These are greenhouses that were put up in 1993. We’ve long ago outgrown the space size-wise, so the functionality has really been limiting us a lot.”

The new structure will help the farm and garden center achieve its aspirations of being relevant during the winter time, which was a difficult task in the past due to the cold interior of the old greenhouses.

The design plans for the regular-framed building will include skylights, windows, and in-floor heating for an efficient and cozy feel, Murphy said.

“It will be a perfect zone for tropicals and house plants,” Murphy said. “It will just feel like an arboretum, a really nice atmosphere.”

The replacement structure will be the first phase of what Murphy hopes is an extensive overhaul. Murphy said that an expansion of the Flower House Cafe into a fully functioning restaurant is on the docket as well as the barn. The updates will come sometime in the next three years, Murphy said.

Because a bulk of sales comes during the spring and summer months, the structure will need to be up and running by February in order to accommodate customers seeking accessories and items that would normally be sold at that time.

Items that were previously stored in the greenhouses were moved to the center’s annual greenhouse while the new building is being built.

After tearing down the greenhouse in October, contractors with W. Joseph Hanson Construction are now working on excavating the site of gravel and other materials. By Thursday, they’ll bring in heavy equipment by tearing down sections of fence surrounding the area. Hanson said they can work with what will likely be an El Nino winter, which will contain wetter than normal conditions but milder temperatures.

Down the road, Murphy hopes the expansion of the barn will offer new retailing opportunities. The new barn will become the new farm store and will include items for dog, cats, chickens, horses, and other accessories supportive of that.

 

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