July 3rd Fireworks in Freeland needs financial support

The 21st Celebrate America is just around the corner and organizers are looking for community support to help throw Freeland's biggest annual event. Bouncy toys for kids have been reserved, the barge is set, food vendors are ready to serve but fireworks are only partially paid for. Financial support is still needed to cover the $35,000 event budget, organizers announced in a recent news release.

Spectators watch the fireworks show at Celebrate America

The 21st Celebrate America is just around the corner and organizers are looking for community support to help throw Freeland’s biggest annual event.

Bouncy toys for kids have been reserved, the barge is set, food vendors are ready to serve but fireworks are only partially paid for. Financial support is still needed to cover the $35,000 event budget, organizers announced in a recent news release.

“Individuals, we really need your help,” said Matt Chambers, pastor of South Whidbey Assembly church.

Celebrate America is held every year on July 3 at Freeland Park. It’s put on by South Whidbey Assembly, but relies on community financial support.

The church is looking for an event sponsor, or individuals, organizations and businesses willing to pitch in money to pay the bills.

“The event only happens because hundreds of people give small and large amounts to support the event,” Chambers said. “Please pass the word around! Everyone’s help is needed.”

To make a donation call the church at 360-221-1656; mail checks to Celebrate America, PO Box 1449, Langley, WA 98260; or visit www.swag-online.org.

Along with food and bouncy toys, this years event will host an entertainment line up that includes: Island Dance, The Kelly Chambers Band, Magician Jeff Evans, Total Experience Gospel Choir, Maggies Fury and Soloist Sean King.

Fireworks begin around 10:30 p.m.

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