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Islanders say ‘move your money’ | NOTABLE

Alex French, 13, holds up a sign at the recent “Move Your Money” demonstration at the Clinton Ferry Terminal that was held in support of the Occupy Wall Street movement. - Dan Freeman photo
Alex French, 13, holds up a sign at the recent “Move Your Money” demonstration at the Clinton Ferry Terminal that was held in support of the Occupy Wall Street movement.
— image credit: Dan Freeman photo

More than 130 people participated in “Move Your Money” demonstrations organized by members of MoveOn Whidbey in Clinton and Coupeville as part of a national MoveOn event in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Organizer Carolyn Tamler said more than 80 people gathered at the Clinton Ferry Terminal for two hours and another 50 or more participated in a demonstration in Coupeville at the intersection of Highway 20 and Main Street for four hours on Saturday, Nov. 5.

Tamler said people from middle school age to their 80s came to the demonstrations. In Clinton, there were many signs that said, “We are the 99%.”

There were also ones reminiscent of the Burma Shave signs, with passers-by seeing a rhyming series of signs: “Big banks caused our dreams to crash; We bailed them out with tons of cash; If you think their greed ain’t funny; Now’s the time to move your money.”

Robbie Cribbs of the local Sound Trap Studios did a 13-minute video with interviews of the Clinton participants and posted it to YouTube (http://youtube/uflfnb_zRaE); it can be found by looking for “We are the 99% — Whidbey Island.”

 

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