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Clinton sculptor stumbles into Oak Harbor | NOTABLE

South Whidbey artist Georgia Gerber (front left) and Oak Harbor Senior Planner Cac Kamak (front right) work with others to set the third duck in Gerber’s “Stumbly Ducklings” piece in downtown Oak Harbor. - Justin Burnett / The Record
South Whidbey artist Georgia Gerber (front left) and Oak Harbor Senior Planner Cac Kamak (front right) work with others to set the third duck in Gerber’s “Stumbly Ducklings” piece in downtown Oak Harbor.
— image credit: Justin Burnett / The Record

Famed Clinton sculptor Georgia Gerber has moved to Oak Harbor — or at least a piece of her art has.

Oak Harbor gained three new and permanent residents earlier this month with the installation of the “Stumbly Ducklings” bronze in downtown Oak Harbor.

The piece, which depicts a heart-warming scene of two ducklings being chased by a third that has “stumbled,” was created by Gerber, who also created Boy and Dog, one of her first major works on Whidbey, which has been the centerpiece of Langley since 1986.

Gerber is also responsible for Seattle’s famous Rachel the pig in Pike Place Market, modeled after a pig of the same name that once lived in Clinton. Her Black Bear and Cubs can be found in both Denver and Tokyo and her Swallowtail Caterpillar has been entertaining kids at the Pacific Science Center since 1998. “Along Colby,” picturing three dancing girls, resides in Everett.

Gerber joined the crew installing the “Stumbly Ducklings” on the southern sidewalk between S.E. Hathaway and S.E. Ireland streets. It is the third and final work specifically commissioned as part of the S.E. Pioneer Way Improvement Project.

Gerber said she was pleased with the result. She had cast similar, smaller versions of the ducklings and used them as a template.

“It was so fun to see them enlarged,” she said.

The bronze that was installed is and will remain a one of a kind. Gerber said the building process began in January and took about six months to complete. Little details that were

indistinguishable in the smaller models, such as texturing, added a special touch to the final piece that will only become more visible with time and handling from the public, she said.

Although Gerber’s work can be seen in cities throughout Washington, she said it is particularly nice when her pieces are displayed on Whidbey Island where she lives and works.

“It’s an honor to be in a town so close and I hope people enjoy them through the seasons,” Gerber said.

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