Community

Interfaith peace vigil set in Freeland on Sunday

St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods Episcopal Church in Freeland will host its fifth annual Community Interfaith Vigil of Peace and Hope on Sunday, Oct. 19.

Moments of silent reflection and music will provide interludes between the readings, prayers and commentaries. The event begins at 3:30 p.m. at the church, 5217 Honeymoon Bay Road.

The vigil will provide an opportunity for St. Augustine’s parishioners and others to share in different worship traditions while expressing a common desire for peace and justice with prayers, readings and music, church officials said.

Island churches, faith communities and peace groups involved in the vigil are Tahoma One Drop Zen Buddhist Monastery, Langley Methodist Church, St. Hubert Catholic Church of Langley, Trinity Lutheran Church, Clinton Society of Friends, St. Augustine’s Episcopal Peace Fellowship, Unitarian Universalists and Coupeville Peace and Reconciliation.

The vigil again will begin with an opening prayer and sutra chanted by the Tahoma One Drop Zen Buddhist Monastery of Freeland.

Also featured will be Muslim Sufi Minister Jamal Rahman of the Interfaith Community Church in Seattle. He will read and chant Qua’ran scripture readings, and offer a short commentary and prayer. He has participated in previous interfaith peace vigils at St. Augustine’s.

The Rev. Rachel Taber-Hamilton will provide a First Nations smudging-cleansing ceremony. A message from the Dalai Lama will be read by Jack Tingstad, and the scripture will be read in Hebrew.

The vigil also will include Christian contributions by individuals from several South Whidbey churches and faith communities, officials said.

As he did last year, recording artist Karl Olsen of Trinity Lutheran Church will led the singing.

The initial inspiration for the interfaith peace vigils came from the northern Oregon Buddhist community’s call in 2004 for prayer and chanting in commemoration of the dropping of the atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.

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