Arts and Entertainment

Crows take over Langley

The crows have landed and they are all over downtown Langley. No, not the flying black Aves that populate many streets and backyards in town. These crows were created by metal artist Scott Alexander and wood artist Mike McVay.

Just in time for Halloween, Langley Main Street Association has erected the three-to-six-foot metal and wood crows to enhance and add a bit of seasonal intrigue to the downtown area.

“Main Street likes to feature what is authentic about Langley, like our waterfront and gray whales and like crows,” said Main Street President Janet Ploof, explaining why crows were selected. “Crows are smart and quirky, like Langley. They make perfect Halloween fellows.”

The crows will add to the ambiance as downtown merchants invite youngsters to Trick or Treat on Halloween, Oct. 31 from 2:30 to 5 p.m. Just look for the Spooktacular poster in participating shop windows and doors.

The crows will continue to reside in the town through Christmas, bearing cranberries, apples or holly, and through the New Year’s Eve bonfire bash at the Whale Bell Park, according to Ploof.

Several smaller feathered crows are on display in shop windows, crow flags are flying, and crow art graces several galleries and shops.

Visitors have taken notice and begun to comment on the art. Alex Walters, from Seattle, was explaining to his two children that crows talk to one another, and do so in a very advanced fashion.

According to Walters, researchers from the University of Washington have studied crows and discovered that they recognize and remember faces, and then pass along the information to other crows.

The study was featured in a 2008 story in the New York Times, www.nytimes.com/2008/08/26/science/26crow.html, or search “Friend or Foe? Crows never forget a face, it seems.”

Walters added that scientists debate whether or not crows actually have a language, but they readily acknowledge that crows have regional dialects, according to Walters.

Crows have a long storied history with mankind. In Native American Indian Mythology, crows were credited as the creators of the world and as the trickster gods, due to their baffling intelligence.

Ploof invites the public to come see the crows and visit downtown Langley, trick-or-treat for Halloween and enjoy shopping and dining.

“Crows stand out for the holidays,” Ploof said, “adding a compelling feature to Langley, where there is always something new to experience.

 

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

Read the latest Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Oct 29 edition online now. Browse the archives.

Friends to Follow

View All Updates