ALL ABOARD: Overdone, underdone, redone, but never outdone

Now that the weather is nicer, many of us are trying to get more things done.

Now that the weather is nicer, many of us are trying to get more things done.

Getting things done is the American dream in action.

How else can one treat oneself to the pleasures of life unless one first gets things done?

Monta Crane’s oft-quoted reference to this subject is worthy of remembering. “There are three ways to get something done: Do it yourself, employ someone, or forbid your children to do it.”

Funny how my teenage years not-to-do list eventually included so many “been there, done that’s.”

“Don’t smoke, Jimmy, it’s not good for you.”

OK then, Mom, only after track meets, not before.

“Don’t drink, Jimmy, it’s not going to help you in any way.”

Tell that to my first sergeant in the Marine Corps.

As a supply clerk, it was my responsibility every Friday afternoon at 1600 hours to buy his half gallon of milk and loaf of bread so he could line his stomach for the weekly Friday night slop-shoot ceremony.

No wonder they call it Wonder Bread.

The older I get, the less I want to do that which I no longer enjoy doing.

The thrill of a good mow is gone.

Now I enjoy the satisfaction of a good rake.

Rock concerts, dust and warm beer no longer stimulate my senses like the sip of an ice cold Vernors on the back porch, watching the neighbor’s cows look stupid.

Think they wonder what we are thinking?

Fortunately, living on Whidbey Island we have the sensibility and source ability to find someone or some organization to help and one qualified to do what we may not want to do, whether we know how or not.

Like care giving.

For every person out there in need, there is a real short list of qualified caregivers.

To me, qualified is a word that is more about a caregiver’s compassion and honesty and comforting than book-learning and certified classes.

Locally we are blessed to have some fine adult family homes that offer 24/7 care to those young and old who cannot be cared for at home or have no family to help.

A tip of the conductor’s cap to Barb and Rick King of Mom and Dad’s House, a licensed adult family home in Freeland, for their superb care of Frank McGee during his yearlong recuperation from a stroke.

Thanks to the care and comfort and unselfish dedication these professional caregivers maintained, night and day, seven days a week for over a year. Frank is now able to move into Maple Ridge Assisted Living Facility to continue on his road to independence.

Certainly there will continue to be several stops for Frank along that road to recovery at 1504 Coffee next door to the Texaco Short Stop in Freeland where Frank and friends Bill, Jack and Andy, Tom, Sandy, Cathi, Mike, JC and others join daily to tolerate sarcasm from folks sharing time while enjoying not getting much else done.

More in Life

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Scorch is a play about gender identification showing at Outcast’s black box theater on the Island County fairgrounds June 13-17. It’s a one-person play, performed by Carmen Berkeley. Director and co-producer Ty Molbak went to middle school in Langley was was active in Whidbey Children’s Theater. Both will be seniors at Rutgers University in the fall. One scene in the play “Scorch” portrays the main character looking into mirrors and wondering what others see.
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Tickets still available for Saturday event

Jordan Shelley, 18, stands outside his home in Greenbank. He recently received the Sydney S. McIntyre Jr Scholarship from Skagit Valley College to go toward his tuition at the University of Washington. Shelley will pursue his childhood dream of becoming a doctor. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group
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Homegrown ‘Frijole Friday’

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Scott Swenson, a National Park Service carpenter, puts the final pieces in on a ramp on the newly restored Pratt Sheep Barn. The 1930s barn will serve as a classroom one it officially opens in July. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group
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Shhh…it’s a surprise party for old-timer Bill Lanning

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New look for familiar frozen treat

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