Arise Charitable Trust shells out nearly $140,000 in educational, charitable grants

  • Friday, June 16, 2017 4:00pm
  • Life

The Arise Charitable Trust recently awarded educational grants totaling $96,000 to South Whidbey women, and $43,611 to char­itable non-profit organizations that assist women.

According to recent news release, individual scholarships were granted to South Whidbey women for their attendance at college or other accredited learning programs. The following women were recipients: Brianne Arnold, Madeline Barker, Ann Berlin, Macey Bishop, Hannah Bond, Thandeka Brigham, Mara Bush, Cayla Calderwood, Hannah Calderwood, Noelle Carty, Lauren Damerau, Morgan Davis, Odessa Donohoe, Isla Dubendorf, Kinsey Eager, Ramona Emerson, Amara Garibyan, Courtney Gerlach, Bayley Gochanour, Allison Graeser, Katie Haugen, Kari Hustad, Angelica Janda, Katyrose Jordan, Bethany Justus, Lillian Kaiser-Schmidt, Anna Leaski, Joellyn Leffler, Anna Lynch, Holly Magnuson, Jeannie Mayotte-Davies, Ellie Morley, Martha Mulholland, Laura Norquist, Faith O’Brochta, Callula Patterson, Rosalena Portillo, Tess Radisch, Madeline Remmen, Sarah Rentmeester, Alea Robertson, Roslyn Schoeler, Melissa Smith, Kaylea Souza and Hannah Whitcomb.

Organizational grants were made to Citizen’s Against Domestic Abuse’s Crisis and Advocacy Program, and Skagit Valley College’s Support the Women in Transition program.

The Arise Charitable Trust was established by an anonymous donor in December 1986 to provide financial assistance to women who wish to meet their full potential in life, but need a helping hand. Examples include women who are seeking help to attend college or other accredited learning programs, teachers wanting to obtain a masters degree, or for organizations taht support women.

The trust considers grant applications twice a year, in May and November. To apply, visit arisecharitabletrust.org or write to Arise Charitable Trust, P.O. Box 1014, Freeland, Washington 98249. The application deadline for the November 2017 session is Oct. 1. Call 331-5792 for details.

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