Charley Ryder stands in his basement, which is full of over 50 years of paintings done by his late wife Helen Ryder. Helen Ryder, a member of Whidbey Allied Artists, died in March and her art will be featured by WAA starting Sept. 21 at the Coupeville Recreation Hall. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

Charley Ryder stands in his basement, which is full of over 50 years of paintings done by his late wife Helen Ryder. Helen Ryder, a member of Whidbey Allied Artists, died in March and her art will be featured by WAA starting Sept. 21 at the Coupeville Recreation Hall. Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times

Celebrating an artistic legacy

Whidbey Allied Artists will feature late colleague’s work

When a longtime member passed away last March, her colleagues at Whidbey Allied Artists couldn’t let her 50 years worth of artwork just sit in her basement.

Helen Ryder joined the nonprofit in 1993 when she moved to the island and taught art classes at the Oak Harbor Senior Center.

Whidbey Allied Artists will feature Ryder’s work from Sept. 21 to 23 at the Coupeville Recreation Hall.

After she became ill and died on March 29, her friend and fellow member Dottie Sanders offered to help Ryder’s husband with her art-related items.

Sanders found three rooms in the Ryders’ basement full of paintings, prints, framing materials and other art supplies.

“It’s just immense,” said Penny Holland, who is now organizing the September show.

Holland took up the project after Sanders unexpectedly died in June. Ryder taught Holland how to cut mats and do frame work and the two were friends.

“She was an excellent teacher and just a generous person with her knowledge,” said Holland.

After going through all the watercolor landscapes, still lifes and some abstract works, Holland and a team she assembled decided to sell them at the annual WAA September show. There will be between 18 and 20 pieces by Ryder, who had been featured in multiple galleries in California and Washington state and won several awards.

“She was good,” said Holland. “We were just amazed when we started looking at all her paintings.”

Her husband Charley said he doesn’t want to make any money from the sales of her work. Instead, proceeds from the show will go toward a golden memorial leaf at the Oak Harbor Senior Center and additional money raised will be donated to WAIF Animal Shelter.

Charley Ryder said he and his wife both loved dogs, which is why he chose the animal shelter. The two met in Long Beach, Calif. because Helen was Charlie’s upstairs neighbor. They married in 1963 and moved to Whidbey Island after they retired.

The large space in the basement for a studio was a large part of the decision to move in for Helen, Charley said.

He said he would watch her paint occasionally and was surprised at how long spent just staring at the blank paper or canvas, planning what she was going to do.

“You could see the gears turning,” he said.

He was always impressed with her work, but he most admired her transition into abstract art after benign familial tremors caused her hands to shake too much for watercolors. Some of Charley’s favorite pieces out of the many hanging in their home were abstract images of color with some three-dimensional aspects.

Holland and other Whidbey Allied Artist members chose and categorized the paintings that will be for sale at the show. She said she will price the paintings and prints at about half what they would normally be at. She said they are “priced to sell.”

“I would just like people to have her art,” said Holland. “I already know I’m buying one.”

The Whidbey Allied Artists show featuring Helen Ryder will be at 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday Sept. 21 and 22, and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 23 at the Coupeville Recreation Hall.

Ryder’s artwork

Ryder’s artwork

Ryder’s artwork

Ryder’s artwork

Photo provided
                                <em>Helen and Charley Ryder stand outside a house in California. Helen Ryder passed away in March. She was a longtime member of Whidbey Allied Artists, and her art will be featured by the nonprofit starting Sept. 21 at the Coupeville Recreation Hall.</em><em></em>

Photo provided Helen and Charley Ryder stand outside a house in California. Helen Ryder passed away in March. She was a longtime member of Whidbey Allied Artists, and her art will be featured by the nonprofit starting Sept. 21 at the Coupeville Recreation Hall.

More in Life

$56,000 awarded to Reserve’s historic buildings

The Trust Board of Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve and the Friends… Continue reading

WhidbeyCon draws fans of the magical and monsterous

The magical, mythical, super and monstrous converged in one, free and family-friendly… Continue reading

Grief in the middle of the ocean

Chris Jordan’s film shows the plight of man through the eyes of albatross

Easter events on Whidbey

Wednesday, April 17Office of Tenebrae, 7 p.m., April 17, St. Hubert Catholic… Continue reading

Poet offers an elixir of words for grief, fear, sadness and loss

Judith Adams: ‘If you have a soul, if you’re a human being, you are a poet’

Scottish group to play at WICA

For one night only, Scotland’s Tannahill Weavers will bring their dynamic, traditional… Continue reading

Farmers markets are gearing up for upcoming season

Vendors and visitors braved wind and rain Saturday as Coupeville launched the… Continue reading

Bats will find new homes at Fort Casey

Parks staff members at Fort Casey can appreciate bats’ importance to the… Continue reading

The ocean under a microscope: Carla Stehr merges art and science

From Carla Stehr’s viewpoint, the ocean is very small. Tiny. Microscopic, in… Continue reading

Arranging life little by little, piece by piece

Assemblage art is all in the details

An eye for elephants

Photographer captures images of African wildlife while assisting conservation efforts

Art galleries springing into April

FIRST SATURDAY Langley Art Walk is 5-7 p.m, Saturday, April 6. Galleries… Continue reading