Clinton garden embraces peaceful setting

Tucked away three miles from the Clinton ferry on Holst Road is a place for peace, a place for harmony, a place to stay a while — One Spirit Garden.

Gloria Sherman clears out areas of her one-acre garden at One Spirit Garden.

Tucked away three miles from the Clinton ferry on Holst Road is a place for peace, a place for harmony, a place to stay a while — One Spirit Garden.

With an acre of gardens and seven acres of wooded trails and ample seating, guests are welcome to enjoy the scenery.

Perennials, shrubs, trees and local artwork is filled throughout the garden’s walkways.

“People come with their friends to sit, talk and even finish a crossword together,” said owner Gloria Sherman. “It’s a place for people to just sit and be.”

For a true estate feel, Sherman serves unlimited loose teas brewed with an infuser along with homemade cakes and soups. Sherman makes the treats with help from her sister, which include vegetarian and gluten-free options. It’s a small operation, but Sherman said if it can’t be done with just the two of them, then she won’t do it so the garden doesn’t overcrowd.

Sherman studied at the Chelsea Physic Garden in England where she learned how to raise herbs and garden. She then acquired a gardening internship at a 13th century stately home.

“When I moved here I thought, this was my chance,” she said.

Sherman has lived in Clinton for four years now and has transformed her home on Holst Road into an estate of her own. This is the second season she has opened her gardens for guests.

One of her regular guests Shirley Jantz of Langley finds One Spirit Garden a place of refuge, sanctuary and sheer delight, she said. She visits the garden every few weeks and stays up to three hours in her thoughts and sharing tea with friends.

Jantz said she enjoys the scenery even in the colder months, but she wishes the garden was open all year.

“It’s just like an old English Inn,” she said.

Freeland resident Effie Brown visits the gardens about three times a year.

“I go there to have conversations with friends. I enjoy walking through the garden paths and woods,” she said.

Brown spends a couple of hours during her visits. She said that’s one of the nice things about visiting is being leisurely, enjoying the tea and being outdoors in a beautiful setting.

“I think it’s a unique experience, especially for out of town guests, to experience the beauty of our island in a delightful way,” she said.

Sherman said she didn’t know if her business would be a success, but by the end of the summer last year, the gardens were crowded. The amount of people who visited last year caused Sherman to limit the gardens to about 16 people in efforts to keep the garden small. Large groups can also reserve the entire garden.

Sherman also teaches meditation classes at the gardens. She studied at The Chopra Center and is a certified instructor through the program.

“People want a peaceful and tranquil place to sit and talk,” she said. “It’s amazing how long people can get together to just talk. I’ve never heard a cell phone go off here.”

One Spirit Garden is open 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday with reservations recommended. The garden is open through Sept. 12. Admission is $12 for adults and $6 for ages 7 to 12. Children ages 6 and younger admitted free. A 10 percent discount for Whidbey Island residents. Contact 360-341-4217 or visit www.onespiritgarden.com

 

 

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