Cloudstone Sculpture Park, a 20-acre private display of the monumental work of Hank Nelson, is open to the public 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 25 and 26. Nelson stands beside one of his carved monoliths, above, made of Dakota Mahogany Granite.

Cloudstone Sculpture Park, a 20-acre private display of the monumental work of Hank Nelson, is open to the public 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 25 and 26. Nelson stands beside one of his carved monoliths, above, made of Dakota Mahogany Granite.

Freeland sculpture park open to public Aug. 25, 26

‘Liberating the image within’ sparks Hank Nelson’s creative vision

Artist Hank Nelson is once again opening his colossal park called Cloudstone Sculpture to the public, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Aug. 25 and Aug 26.

There will be tours of both the 20-acre sculpture park and the studio and gallery.

Nelson will be available to discuss his work, which includes monumental 12-ton Dakota Mahogany Granite monoliths and 20-foot steel structures.

Nelson is known for both his individual stonework and sprawling installations which reveal his worldview, inspirations and rather bleak take on the future of humankind.

He also creates smaller pieces from marble and other stone, Lazuli carvings and bronze figures.

Cloudstone Sculpture is open to the public twice a year, in April and August, and at other times by appointment.

Cloudstone Sculpture is the vision of Nelson. He’s been shaping it the past dozen years since purchasing 20 acres of land in 1993.

Hundreds of his creations — at last count, 380 — are installed among trees, mounds and valleys.

Some of the mounds and valleys are actually part of Nelson’s earthworks, constructed with the help of a 1950s rusted-out logging grappler affectionately called “The Beast.”

Considered a master, mentor and a visionary among his peers, Nelson was honored in April by the nonprofit Sculpture Northwest “for following his dreams in the design and creation of Cloudstone and for his contributions to the arts.”

Few Whidbey residents know Cloudstone exists as Nelson mostly keeps to his land, shaping stone and steel.

But a newly-formed Cloudstone Foundation and board of directors is beginning to carve out an educational component dedicated to “creation, appreciation, and advancement of three-dimensional art, as well as the preservation and display of the artistic work of Hank Nelson.”

Tours, workshops and seminars are planned and its first intern selected.

Cloudstone Sculpture Park and Gallery, 5056 Cloudstone Lane, off Bush Point Road, Freeland is open to the public 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 25 and Aug. 26. Entry fee is $10 per person or $35 for an annual pass, which covers four people. Tours offered. Sculptor Hank Nelson will discuss his work.

The Aug. 25 and 26 public tour of Cloudstone Sculpture Park includes viewing the gallery and studio of Hank Nelson.

The Aug. 25 and 26 public tour of Cloudstone Sculpture Park includes viewing the gallery and studio of Hank Nelson.

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