Loganberry Festival reaches new heights

A popular festival on Central Whidbey will soar to new heights next week.

Steve Layman and his falcon will be in action during the Greenbank Farm’s Loganberry Festival that takes place July 27-28. He is one of three falconers demonstrating during the two-day festival.

A popular festival on Central Whidbey will soar to new heights next week.

Three falconers demonstrate their craft during both days of the Loganberry Festival next weekend July 27-28 at Greenbank Farm.

Farm Manager Judy Feldman said falconers Steve Layman, Joel Gerlach and Mark Borden will display their falcons’ abilities and talk about how raptors are a benefit to agriculture.

The annual Loganberry Festival was started in 1991 by Chateau St. Michelle, which owned the farm and was the largest grower of loganberries in the United States.

The farm’s activities changed over the years as the farm entered into public ownership and became an integral part of Central Whidbey Island.

While only one patch of the berries remain at the farm, Feldman said, organizers want to keep the loganberry name to provide a connection to the farm’s past.

Even though the loganberry has diminished in Greenbank, agriculture is still a vital part to the farm.

The recently established farmer to training center is growing a new crop of farmers who will eventually establish farms of their own.

Visitors to the training center’s fields will enjoy the treat of seeing Greg Lange, along with his team of horses, conduct plowing demonstrations.

Greenbank Farm is also home to art galleries, a cheese shop, restaurant and wine shop.

Port of Coupeville recently approved installation of new solar panels and visitors can see firsthand the progress of the sustainable energy project while they attend the weekend festival.

Animals have become a more visible part of the Loganberry Festival in recent years.

Jillian Santi will demonstrate “cowgirl dressage” to Johnny Cash music and riders from Equestrian Crossings will perform horse vaulting. Those are just two of the animal events that take place at the farm.

Feldman highlighted a medieval promenade scheduled in the afternoon. The promenade is a Renaissance-themed procession from the farm fields to the arena located across the parking lot near the farm buildings.

The farm, which is home to a popular dog-walking area, will host several canine-related activities during the festival.

Dog agility contests and Frisbee activities are sure to be popular with the pet owners.

The Loganberry Festival also includes a full slate of live music, arts and crafts booths, wine tastings and a beer garden and children’s activities. And no Loganberry Festival is complete without the popular pie-eating contests.

For more information, go to www.greenbankfarm.com

 

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