Gordon Marvin photo — Dave Anderson shares a memory about the beginnings of the Maxwelton Outdoor Classroom.

Gordon Marvin photo — Dave Anderson shares a memory about the beginnings of the Maxwelton Outdoor Classroom.

Over 50 people attend outdoor classroom celebration

  • Thursday, November 9, 2017 8:58am
  • Life

The Maxwelton Outdoor Classroom marked its 20th anniversary with a celebration event on Wednesday, Oct. 25.

The gathering aimed to highlight the efforts of visionaries and volunteers who brought the outdoor classroom to life two decades ago and for those who run it today. It also featured a timeline of the outdoor classroom’s history, food, hot cider and a tour of the trails and a visit to Maxwelton Creek.

Over 50 people attended, including several people who played key roles in the outdoor classroom’s early years. The speakers included Rick Baker, Rene Neff, Susie Nelson, Don Meehan, Pat McVay, Dave Anderson, Rich Shaughnessey, Ray Green, Nancy Scoles, Jo Moccia, and Ann Linnea.

In 1994, Anderson helped design and create trails around the wetland where the outdoor classroom was eventually built. He also created trails down to the creek. Anderson also served as a board member for several years and helped coordinate “Green Home Tours” in 2002 and 2003 that served as a fundraiser for the organization.

Linnea also documented the area’s history and stewardship efforts in her 2002 book, ”A Journey Through the Maxwelton Watershed.”

Gordon Marvin photo — Anne Linnea reads an excerpt from her book on the Maxwelton Watershed.

Gordon Marvin photo — Anne Linnea reads an excerpt from her book on the Maxwelton Watershed.

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