Up close and personal with Paula Pugh | HOMETOWN HERO

A quick Q&A with this month's Hometown Hero, Paula Pugh.

Evelyn Transeth and her daughter Paula Pugh

Your favorite song?

“I first fell in love with ‘On Eagles’ Wings’ when I heard South Whidbey musician Karl Olsen sing it, and it always brings me to tears. ‘You shall dwell in the shelter of the Lord, Who Abide in His Shadow for life. Say to the Lord, My Refuge. My Rock in whom I trust. And he will Raise you up on Eagles’ Wings, and make you shine like the sun.’”

What is one of the hardest things in life you went through?

“Watching my sister die of cancer at age 52.”

What is class?

“Seeing the inside of everyone. Treating everyone with the same dignity if they step out of a limousine or are homeless on the street.”

What question would you ask God?

“Why the reason for suffering? Why do children not all have enough food and love? Why the need for wars? I don’t understand.”

What inanimate object would you like to be for a day?

“I don’t think anything is truly inanimate, everything has molecules, everything was made by God or a human for a purpose, and it’s all made out of materials from the world.”

What book would you like to write someday?

“I just wrote it, titled ‘Celebrating and Beginnings and Endings, Mark the Moment Book 1.’”

What is something a lot do not know about you?

“I am afraid to throw anything out. I may need it one day; also I have emotional attachments to everything. Maybe this is a scarcity problem, it could just be a flaw.”

Your favorite book?

“My favorite book changes all the time, but recently I read, ‘When Helping Hurts’ (Corbett and Fikkert). I think this is an important book for all who volunteer or do mission work. Also the book ‘Proof of Heaven’ (Alexander), where a hard core scientist, neurologist, unbeliever went into a coma and felt heaven.”

More in Life

Blues, berries, fun and fundraising at Saturday festival

Mutiny Bay Blues Farm hosts Commons Cafe event

Annual street dance, live bands set for Saturday

Langley’s new annual dancing-in-the-street summertime tradition is back for the third year,… Continue reading

New public art debuts in Langley

Steel and glass shape pieces chosen by arts commission

Denis Zimmermann and his wife, Cheryl, run Langley’s new ramen restaurant, Ultra House, which opened in May 2018. Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times.
Langley restaurant owner is recreating his childhood with new ramen house

Denis Zimmer-mann said he’s not re-inventing the wheel with his ramen restaurant… Continue reading

A 1941 Graham Hollywood, owned by Roy Deaver of Clinton, was chosen as Best of Show in the Cool Bayview Nights car show Saturday.
Rain doesn’t dampen the fun at Cool Bayview Nights car show

Attendees selected the mildly modified and rebuilt 1941 Graham Hollywood, owned by… Continue reading

Shakespeare Festival plays emotional range

Female directors, perspective at the forefront

Expanding knowledge

Whidbey Institute adds more lodging, plans open house

Congolese Festival is a chance to celebrate, educate

Last event before Northwest Cultural Center relocates

Shhh…it’s a surprise party for old-timer Bill Lanning

Friends, customers invited to celebrate former owner of Bill’s Feed Tack

Mucking about for clams

‘Digging for Dinner’ a popular Sound Water activity

Scorch is a play about gender identification showing at Outcast’s black box theater on the Island County fairgrounds June 13-17. It’s a one-person play, performed by Carmen Berkeley. Director and co-producer Ty Molbak went to middle school in Langley was was active in Whidbey Children’s Theater. Both will be seniors at Rutgers University in the fall. One scene in the play “Scorch” portrays the main character looking into mirrors and wondering what others see.
‘Scorch’ looks at first love and ‘gender fraud’

Irish play revolves around one character’s confusion

Whidbey Island Garden Tour highlights five homes

Tickets still available for Saturday event