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Bag program will help South Whidbey schools

John Riley, South Whidbey Schools Foundation board member, with Red Apple Market owner Steve Springer. The market will contribute five cents to the foundation for every grocery bag turned in. - Photo courtesy of Donna Riley
John Riley, South Whidbey Schools Foundation board member, with Red Apple Market owner Steve Springer. The market will contribute five cents to the foundation for every grocery bag turned in.
— image credit: Photo courtesy of Donna Riley

For those looking to raise money to help the South End’s financially strapped schools, the latest opportunity is in the bag.

The nonprofit South Whidbey Schools Foundation and Red Apple Market at Ken’s Korner in Clinton will launch a program to turn surplus grocery bags into cash.

“With the draconian cuts in funding for our schools today, literally every nickel and dime helps,” said Donna Riley of the foundation.

Beginning next week, Red Apple will pay five cents for each grocery bag (any design, any size, from any store), and will contribute an additional five cents to the schools foundation. The customer will then be offered the opportunity to contribute his or her nickel to the foundation as well.

“It’s totally win-win for both our schools and for the environment,” Riley said.

She said a flyer promoting the program will be sent home with all South Whidbey School District students next week. The flyer will include a coupon for a free reusable grocery bag from Red Apple. Persons presenting a copy of this Record story also will receive a free bag, Riley said.

The South Whidbey Schools Foundation was formed in 1994 to help fill gaps in the South End public school programs, and through the years has distributed more than $100,000 to district schools.

The foundation provides grants each year for individual school projects not covered by school-district funds. In the past, the foundation has funded the high school’s competitive solar-car program, and classroom equipment for shop, science, arts and music projects.

It also serves as a pass-through agency for people in the community donating money to keep programs going, such as the school jazz bands.

This past year the foundation distributed about $23,000 in chunks of about $1,000 or less.

Riley said the grocery-bag program has a lot of money-raising potential.

“Maybe other stores will follow suit, and we’ll find a significant new community-based source for our South Whidbey schools,” Riley said.

For more information, e-mail Riley at rileys@whidbey.com.

 

 

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