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Helping hands come together to make light work at Clinton’s Hammons Preserve

Volunteers pose for a photo at a recent work party at Hammons Preserve. Pictured, from left to right are: Quintin Viers, Bob Gentz, Sandy Charlwood, Jake Boone, Bobbi Cantwell, Beth Wyatt, Tom Trimbath, Paul Louden, Loretta Wilson, John Boone, Ted Ravetz and Ruth Stibre.  - Contributed photo
Volunteers pose for a photo at a recent work party at Hammons Preserve. Pictured, from left to right are: Quintin Viers, Bob Gentz, Sandy Charlwood, Jake Boone, Bobbi Cantwell, Beth Wyatt, Tom Trimbath, Paul Louden, Loretta Wilson, John Boone, Ted Ravetz and Ruth Stibre.
— image credit: Contributed photo

A group of energetic Whidbey Camano Land Trust volunteers convened at the Hammons Preserve in Clinton last Friday to care for conifer trees that were planted this spring as part of a forest restoration project.

The trees were planted in a former pasture and needed all the help they could get to grow strong and expand the forest cover at the Preserve for the benefit of birds and other wildlife, according to a news release from the Whidbey Camano Land Trust. The volunteers weeded and mulched the trees with compost from the Langley Wastewater Treatment facility.

The Whidbey Camano Land Trust is continually searching for stewardship volunteers to help care for the land. For details, visit www.wclt.org/get-involved or email Ida at ida@wclt.org.

 

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