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Hay farming tradition still strong in Village by the Sea

Vance Tillman bales hay in a field on the other side of Third Street from St. Hubert Catholic Church in Langley. Tillman’s wife is Tiny Tillman of the Fossek family, which has had the property since the time of Tiny’s great, great grandmother, who had a hotel next to the field in 1906. Vance Tillman, with a face covered in dust, said the family has likely been growing hay in the lot for more than 100 years. It’s sold for feed to Whidbey farmers, but they also keep some for their own cattle. - Justin Burnett / The Record
Vance Tillman bales hay in a field on the other side of Third Street from St. Hubert Catholic Church in Langley. Tillman’s wife is Tiny Tillman of the Fossek family, which has had the property since the time of Tiny’s great, great grandmother, who had a hotel next to the field in 1906. Vance Tillman, with a face covered in dust, said the family has likely been growing hay in the lot for more than 100 years. It’s sold for feed to Whidbey farmers, but they also keep some for their own cattle.
— image credit: Justin Burnett / The Record

Hay farming is in full swing on Whidbey Island, as seen here in Langley this week.

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