Author supports WGH with true story | NOTABLE

Two near-death experiences and recovery at the hands of Whidbey General Hospital staff make for a huge story. Throw in humor, tales of friendship and community support and the story becomes a real humdinger.

Coupeville author Stephanie Ione Haskins donated several copies of her book “Humdinger” to the Whidbey General Hospital Gift Shop. Haskins

Two near-death experiences and recovery at the hands of Whidbey General Hospital staff make for a huge story. Throw in humor, tales of friendship and community support and the story becomes a real humdinger.

Coupeville author Stephanie Ione Haskins donated several copies of her book “Humdinger” to the Whidbey General Hospital Gift Shop. In the book, Haskins details the events that changed her life in 2007, when she suffered a massive brain aneurysm and was taken to WGH. The book describes the events of the aneurysm and two years later, her battle with leukemia.

She shares with the reader her love of Whidbey General Hospital and the people in it, as she credits them with saving her life, twice.

“I am a survivor,” Haskins said. “I was given the chance to fight both the aneurysm and leukemia because of the healthcare provided by Whidbey General Hospital. I wrote this book to be an inspiration to others who may be traveling a journey similar to mine and to let our community know what a precious jewel they have in WGH.”

“I thought it was absolutely awe-inspiring,” said Michelle Suggs, Gift Shop manager. “It’s just a wonderful, wonderful book. She doesn’t just talk about the two illnesses, it’s just a whole book about strength. She’s one determined woman.”

Haskins autographed each copy she donated to WGH. Proceeds from the sales go to the WGH Auxiliary Gift Shop. Since the Gift Shop is run by volunteers, all the proceeds go toward donations of new equipment for the hospital or for local students contemplating careers in healthcare.

“It’s nice to have them donated because the money goes directly back into the hospital,” Suggs said, adding that it will fund the programs that saved Haskins’ life.

“It’s nice to have this addition to the shop,” Suggs said. The majority of items for sale are handmade, so Suggs said it’s great to have a local author’s book that’s about the hospital.

Suggs said that “Humdinger” is a great read. Haskins adds her own brand of humor while detailing the hospital and community care she received.

“It’s for somebody who wants a really easy to read, awe-inspiring book,” Suggs said.

There’s also much to learn from it.

“For me, it kind of helps with the fear that patients have, it takes a lot of the mystery out of it, I think,” Suggs added.

It also teaches about recovering from such experiences while maintaining a sense of humor.

While recovering and trying to learn to think all over again, Haskins would watch the hummingbirds in her yard but kept calling them humdingers. Coupled with the meaning of the word, Haskins chose “Humdinger” as the title of her book.

“It’s the little things about it that really hit home,” Suggs said.

“It just leaves you with this really good feeling about our local hospital and the level of care that people receive,” Suggs said. “You will enjoy it.”

For more information, call WGH at 360-678-5151.

 

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