Cable, plants may trip up Admiralty Inlet turbine project

The proximity of rare plants and an international communications cable may present obstacles for a plan to locate tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet. The Snohomish County Public Utility District submitted a final license application in March to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for a permit to install two energy-producing turbines in Admiralty Inlet. The proposed location is one kilometer west of Central Whidbey’s Keystone Harbor.

The proximity of rare plants and an international communications cable may present obstacles for a plan to locate tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet.

The Snohomish County Public Utility District submitted a final license application in March to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for a permit to install two energy-producing turbines in Admiralty Inlet. The proposed location is one kilometer west of Central Whidbey’s Keystone Harbor.

But the pilot project has some challenges.

Among the groups that have filed as intervenors is Whidbey Environmental Action Network, commonly known as WEAN. The group is concerned about possible environmental damage caused by the turbines in the marine environment as well as the PUD’s proposal to construct the on-land portion of the system at Keystone Spit, which could impact a “relatively rare native plant community,” WEAN reported in a press release.

In addition, PC Landing Corp. filed a motion to intervene and protest the project. The company, together with Japanese affiliates, owns the Pacific Crossing fiber-optic submarine cable system. The company characterizes the 13,076 miles of cable as “a major, high-capacity international telecommunications link between the United States and Japan.”

The problem is that the proposed locations for the turbines would put them at 100 and 150 meters, respectively, from the cable.

“Placement of an experimental turbine project within 100 meters of a major, operational submarine cable system would be nonsensical and contrary to the public and security interests of the United States,” the motion states.

PC Landing Corp., WEAN and other proposed intervenors want the PUD to go through a full Environmental Impact Statement process.

Marianne Edain of WEAN argued that the PUD’s proposal is deeply flawed and shows a lack of attention to detail.

“Unfortunately, such slapdash work does a disservice to the potential for tidal power,” she wrote.

“The underlying questions will likely never be addressed because of the failings of this particular proposal.”

The turbines are the centerpiece of a project to study the viability of using tidal currents to generate electricity. The turbines will produce

300 kilowatts of energy, which is enough to power 250 homes, but they will only be in place for three to five years.

More in News

Author to sign new book at the Langley Whale Center

A “Meet the Author” and book signing event with Whidbey Island author… Continue reading

School districts wrestle with too much snow and not enough time for teaching

Some may seek state waivers to avoid adding more days in June

Voters strongly support South Whidbey school levies

Both ballot measures pass with 70 percent support

Conference will focus on mental wellbeing of first responders

Imagine a day in which you help a couple whose baby died… Continue reading

Law would celebrate public lands in Washington state

By Madeline Coats WNPA Olympia News Bureau Lawmakers seek to celebrate public… Continue reading

Lawmakers seek permanent solution to the homeless crisis

By Madeline Coats WNPA Olympia News Bureau A group of 11 Democratic… Continue reading

Presentation planned on long-term care bill

A Whidbey Island group is offering a presentation on a bill regarding… Continue reading

Continued resistance against gun control initiative; Attorney General defends law

By Madeline Coats WNPA Olympia News Bureau The state attorney general has… Continue reading

Most Read