Goosefoot, nonprofits partner for better philanthropy

  • Wednesday, April 26, 2017 8:00am
  • News

Four Whidbey non-profit organizations are teaming up with Goosefoot to leverage their support to the community.

Goosefoot is expanding its grant programs and the board recently agreed to adopt the four as “supported organizations.” They include South Whidbey at Home, Whidbey Camano Land Trust, Whidbey Island Nourishes and Whidbey Watershed Stewards.

“We’re looking forward to the experience and knowledge that our supported organizations and new board members will bring to the table,” says Kevin Engstrom, Goosefoot board president.

“Together, we will decide how best to direct Goosefoot’s philanthropy to have the most impact on our local community.”

Each group will appoint two members to the Goosefoot board of directors. They will receive some funding from Goosefoot, but remain autonomous.

Philanthropy is a recent role for Goosefoot. Founded in 1999, it is known primarily for economic and real estate development projects on South Whidbey such as the Bayview Cash Store, the Bayview Shopping Center, the Sears House, and the Goose Grocer.

In a recent news release, Goosefoot Executive Director Sandra Whiting said the four organizations were specifically selected from the scores of nonprofits on the South End.

“It wasn’t easy, especially with so many amazing non-profit organizations operating on South Whidbey,” she said. “Ultimately, we chose organizations with very specific missions that differed from each other, but fit into Goosefoot’s broader mission and vision of a thriving South Whidbey.”

Goosefoot recently changed its federal tax status from that of a “private foundation” to a “supporting organization” (both tax-exempt classifications), allowing the organization to realize its full philanthropic potential.

Goosefoot will continue managing commercial properties at Bayview Corner and Bayview Center, and putting on events such as street dances, the Mutt Strut, and Mardi Gras, Whiting said.

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