Langley ethics board finds no conflict with property rezoning dilemma

  • Saturday, December 2, 2017 10:00am
  • News

The Langley Ethics Training and Advisory Board found no evidence of a conflict of interest when a Langley Planning Advisory Board member participation in a vote to rezone property he owns from residential to commercial.

JR Fulton, a member of the Planning Advisory Board, owns a parcel of land located on Second Street and DeBruyn Avenue. The advisory request submitted by Mayor Tim Callison asked if ethic misconduct occurred when he participated in discussions and decisions regarding the rezoning of the parcel he owns. The board wrote in a Nov. 14 opinion that the planning board’s proposal to rezone the land preceded both Fulton’s purchase of the property and his tenure on the committee.

It also found a “degree of ambiguity” concerning his participation and/or recusal from zoning discussions regarding his property “he owned or was considering purchasing” after his appointment to the board. The board’s opinion says Fulton recused himself from a discussion at a Sept. 6 meeting about the property, which the board felt was in “good faith” and supports their conclusion of good ethical conduct.

But, “the record is unclear” regarding his participation, discussion and vote at an Oct. 4 meeting surrounding a proposed zoning amendment to a three-block area between First Street and Third Street and from DeBruyn Avenue to Park Avenue, which includes Fulton’s property.

Because of a lack of evidence regarding Fulton’s role at the meeting and because of his earlier recusal, the board “prefers to give Mr. Fulton the benefit of the doubt with regard to his potential ethical oversight.”

The board opined that the minutes of the Oct. 4 meeting were “not properly” documented and that it isn’t transparent to any citizen reading the minutes of the meeting. It also wrote that the minutes should reflect how potential conflicts of interests are handled, and that city officials and volunteer board members continue training in managing conflicts of interest.

More in News

Icy roads lead to six crashes on Thursday

It was an unlucky day for South Whidbey drivers on Thursday morning… Continue reading

Critics reignite issues with The Machine Shop in Langley

Patience is wearing thin among some of The Machine Shop’s critics. Three… Continue reading

New Island County contract brings more WSU programs

As of March 1, Washington State University Extension, Island County will serve… Continue reading

Man who burned down two homes pleads guilty to lesser charge

A man who started a fire that burned down two homes on… Continue reading

Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group
                                Deputy Marshal Leif Haugen reads to second grader Colby Terry in the library of Coupeville Elementary School. Haugen is part of the recently launched “Bigs with Badges” program at Big Brother Big Sisters that pairs children in the community with law enforcement officers.
Bigs with Badges: Connecting with kids

On a typical Tuesday afternoon, students and staff at Coupeville Elementary School… Continue reading

Historical society to lead presentation about Gabelein family history

Pick up a local phone book. Thumb to the page with the… Continue reading

Van driver accused of ramming pickup truck

The driver of a van is accused of chasing down a car… Continue reading

South End getting first drug treatment center

Freeland will soon be home to the first medicaid-funded substance use disorder… Continue reading

Langley man airlifted after rollover crash

A Langley resident was airlifted for treatment after rolling his 1995 Ford… Continue reading

Most Read