As you are undoubtedly aware, the population of Island County increased 20 percent in the past 10 years. We are expected to add another 17,200 residents over the next 10 years. The increasing rate of development has brought us to a critical junction with regard to protecting the landscape that makes Whidbey a place where people want to live and visit.Despite the Growth Management Act's requirement to protect the environment and reduce sprawl, Island County has issued a Mitigated Determination of Non Significance (MDNS) for the Freeland A-OK Exxon, MiniMart, Quicklube, Carwash and MiniStorage project on Highway 525. An MDNS means that county staff have evaluated the project and determined that, if certain conditions are met, the proposed project will not have significant adverse impacts on the environment. The certain conditions in this case is payment of approximately $27,000 by the developers toward stoplight construction costs. (Beyond the cost of the installation of the stop light will be a need to further upgrade the twin lanes on Fish Road and the highway at the cost of approximately $540,000. The developers' 5 percent share is $27,000).Concerned community members have formed a group, People for Reasonable, Organized Urban Development (PROUD) to support the challenge of the MDNS.PROUD's goals are twofold: to stop the Freeland Exxon development, and to educate the public and local decision-makers, encouraging them to support sensible, planned growth in Island County.The Freeland Sub-Area Planning Group, whose appointed members have been working for 16 months to design Freeland's future growth, is in favor of a scenic view corridor for the highway through Freeland. Allowing this project to vest doesn't fit well with that concept, and certainly doesn't indicate much support for this group's work or vision by the county commissioners. For these reasons, some citizens, including PROUD members, are in favor of having a moratorium on future development (other than individual single family homes) to avoid foreclosing the planning options that this group is working on.Primary concerns raised by the public are:* Impact of sprawl-type development on our fragile island* Ugly urban sprawl; more visual blight on the highway* Potential damage to wetland system; violation of wetland ordinance* Potential for groundwater contamination from underground tanks and Quicklube petrochemicals, antifreeze, and other toxic fluids* Surface water runoff problems, including pollution of Puget Sound, increased drainage problems, and flooding* Increased traffic danger (there have been three fatalities at that intersection already this year)* Unnecessary competition for other local small businesses* Misuse of available land; loss of valuable wetland* No way to compensate for loss of rural character* This kind of development is Lynnwoodey, belongs on Highway 99, not Whidbey* Impacts to nearby heron rookery and other wildlifeWhere we are:WEAN, on behalf of PROUD, filed a notice of appeal with the Island County Hearing Examiner on May 23, 2000 in order to meet the deadline for citizen appeals. PROUD and WEAN hired attorney David Bricklin of Bricklin & Gendler, who will write the perfected appeal for the June 15 hearing in front of Hearing Examiner Michael Bobbink. If the hearing examiner rules against us -- that is, he doesn't remand the matter to the county and order that a Determination of Significance (DS) be issued for the project, which would trigger the requirement to prepare an environmental impact statement -- we will file an appeal in Island County Superior Court. Technically, the jurisdiction for rescinding the DNS for this project lies with the county's SEPA responsible official (Public Works Director Larry Kwarsick). The ultimate legal authority to protect the environment lies with the three county commissioners. If the county had complied with the Growth Management Hearings Board order to eliminate this area from the RAID by Nov. 30, this project would not have vested (would have been denied) because the application was filed Dec. 8, AFTER the county was supposed to comply. While the county continues to defy GMA, projects are vesting. The county has now been given until June 30 to remove areas from the RAID, and despite the fact that they can do that at any time, they are waiting until June 29.Please feel free to call me at 331-8876, or Jennifer Lail at 221-7838, with any questions.Jerry Hill, a member of PROUD, is lives in Freeland." "/> As you are undoubtedly aware, the population of Island County increased 20 percent in the past 10 years. We are expected to add another 17,200 residents over the next 10 years. The increasing rate of development has brought us to a critical junction with regard to protecting the landscape that makes Whidbey a place where people want to live and visit.Despite the Growth Management Act's requirement to protect the environment and reduce sprawl, Island County has issued a Mitigated Determination of Non Significance (MDNS) for the Freeland A-OK Exxon, MiniMart, Quicklube, Carwash and MiniStorage project on Highway 525. An MDNS means that county staff have evaluated the project and determined that, if certain conditions are met, the proposed project will not have significant adverse impacts on the environment. The certain conditions in this case is payment of approximately $27,000 by the developers toward stoplight construction costs. (Beyond the cost of the installation of the stop light will be a need to further upgrade the twin lanes on Fish Road and the highway at the cost of approximately $540,000. The developers' 5 percent share is $27,000).Concerned community members have formed a group, People for Reasonable, Organized Urban Development (PROUD) to support the challenge of the MDNS.PROUD's goals are twofold: to stop the Freeland Exxon development, and to educate the public and local decision-makers, encouraging them to support sensible, planned growth in Island County.The Freeland Sub-Area Planning Group, whose appointed members have been working for 16 months to design Freeland's future growth, is in favor of a scenic view corridor for the highway through Freeland. Allowing this project to vest doesn't fit well with that concept, and certainly doesn't indicate much support for this group's work or vision by the county commissioners. For these reasons, some citizens, including PROUD members, are in favor of having a moratorium on future development (other than individual single family homes) to avoid foreclosing the planning options that this group is working on.Primary concerns raised by the public are:* Impact of sprawl-type development on our fragile island* Ugly urban sprawl; more visual blight on the highway* Potential damage to wetland system; violation of wetland ordinance* Potential for groundwater contamination from underground tanks and Quicklube petrochemicals, antifreeze, and other toxic fluids* Surface water runoff problems, including pollution of Puget Sound, increased drainage problems, and flooding* Increased traffic danger (there have been three fatalities at that intersection already this year)* Unnecessary competition for other local small businesses* Misuse of available land; loss of valuable wetland* No way to compensate for loss of rural character* This kind of development is Lynnwoodey, belongs on Highway 99, not Whidbey* Impacts to nearby heron rookery and other wildlifeWhere we are:WEAN, on behalf of PROUD, filed a notice of appeal with the Island County Hearing Examiner on May 23, 2000 in order to meet the deadline for citizen appeals. PROUD and WEAN hired attorney David Bricklin of Bricklin & Gendler, who will write the perfected appeal for the June 15 hearing in front of Hearing Examiner Michael Bobbink. If the hearing examiner rules against us -- that is, he doesn't remand the matter to the county and order that a Determination of Significance (DS) be issued for the project, which would trigger the requirement to prepare an environmental impact statement -- we will file an appeal in Island County Superior Court. Technically, the jurisdiction for rescinding the DNS for this project lies with the county's SEPA responsible official (Public Works Director Larry Kwarsick). The ultimate legal authority to protect the environment lies with the three county commissioners. If the county had complied with the Growth Management Hearings Board order to eliminate this area from the RAID by Nov. 30, this project would not have vested (would have been denied) because the application was filed Dec. 8, AFTER the county was supposed to comply. While the county continues to defy GMA, projects are vesting. The county has now been given until June 30 to remove areas from the RAID, and despite the fact that they can do that at any time, they are waiting until June 29.Please feel free to call me at 331-8876, or Jennifer Lail at 221-7838, with any questions.Jerry Hill, a member of PROUD, is lives in Freeland.""PROUD to oppose gas station complex>As you are undoubtedly aware, the population of Island County increased 20 percent in the past 10 years. We are expected to add another 17,200 residents over the next 10 years. The increasing rate of development has brought us to a critical junction with regard to protecting the landscape that makes Whidbey a place where people want to live and visit.Despite the Growth Management Act's requirement to protect the environment and reduce sprawl, Island County has issued a Mitigated Determination of Non Significance (MDNS) for the Freeland A-OK Exxon, MiniMart, Quicklube, Carwash and MiniStorage project on Highway 525. An MDNS means that county staff have evaluated the project and determined that, if certain conditions are met, the proposed project will not have significant adverse impacts on the environment. The certain conditions in this case is payment of approximately $27,000 by the developers toward stoplight construction costs. (Beyond the cost of the installation of the stop light will be a need to further upgrade the twin lanes on Fish Road and the highway at the cost of approximately $540,000. The developers' 5 percent share is $27,000).Concerned community members have formed a group, People for Reasonable, Organized Urban Development (PROUD) to support the challenge of the MDNS.PROUD's goals are twofold: to stop the Freeland Exxon development, and to educate the public and local decision-makers, encouraging them to support sensible, planned growth in Island County.The Freeland Sub-Area Planning Group, whose appointed members have been working for 16 months to design Freeland's future growth, is in favor of a scenic view corridor for the highway through Freeland. Allowing this project to vest doesn't fit well with that concept, and certainly doesn't indicate much support for this group's work or vision by the county commissioners. For these reasons, some citizens, including PROUD members, are in favor of having a moratorium on future development (other than individual single family homes) to avoid foreclosing the planning options that this group is working on.Primary concerns raised by the public are:* Impact of sprawl-type development on our fragile island* Ugly urban sprawl; more visual blight on the highway* Potential damage to wetland system; violation of wetland ordinance* Potential for groundwater contamination from underground tanks and Quicklube petrochemicals, antifreeze, and other toxic fluids* Surface water runoff problems, including pollution of Puget Sound, increased drainage problems, and flooding* Increased traffic danger (there have been three fatalities at that intersection already this year)* Unnecessary competition for other local small businesses* Misuse of available land; loss of valuable wetland* No way to compensate for loss of rural character* This kind of development is Lynnwoodey, belongs on Highway 99, not Whidbey* Impacts to nearby heron rookery and other wildlifeWhere we are:WEAN, on behalf of PROUD, filed a notice of appeal with the Island County Hearing Examiner on May 23, 2000 in order to meet the deadline for citizen appeals. PROUD and WEAN hired attorney David Bricklin of Bricklin & Gendler, who will write the perfected appeal for the June 15 hearing in front of Hearing Examiner Michael Bobbink. If the hearing examiner rules against us -- that is, he doesn't remand the matter to the county and order that a Determination of Significance (DS) be issued for the project, which would trigger the requirement to prepare an environmental impact statement -- we will file an appeal in Island County Superior Court. Technically, the jurisdiction for rescinding the DNS for this project lies with the county's SEPA responsible official (Public Works Director Larry Kwarsick). The ultimate legal authority to protect the environment lies with the three county commissioners. If the county had complied with the Growth Management Hearings Board order to eliminate this area from the RAID by Nov. 30, this project would not have vested (would have been denied) because the application was filed Dec. 8, AFTER the county was supposed to comply. While the county continues to defy GMA, projects are vesting. The county has now been given until June 30 to remove areas from the RAID, and despite the fact that they can do that at any time, they are waiting until June 29.Please feel free to call me at 331-8876, or Jennifer Lail at 221-7838, with any questions.Jerry Hill, a member of PROUD, is lives in Freeland." "/> Viewpoint - South Whidbey Record
Opinion

Viewpoint

"PROUD to oppose gas station complex>As you are undoubtedly aware, the population of Island County increased 20 percent in the past 10 years. We are expected to add another 17,200 residents over the next 10 years. The increasing rate of development has brought us to a critical junction with regard to protecting the landscape that makes Whidbey a place where people want to live and visit.Despite the Growth Management Act's requirement to protect the environment and reduce sprawl, Island County has issued a Mitigated Determination of Non Significance (MDNS) for the Freeland A-OK Exxon, MiniMart, Quicklube, Carwash and MiniStorage project on Highway 525. An MDNS means that county staff have evaluated the project and determined that, if certain conditions are met, the proposed project will not have significant adverse impacts on the environment. The certain conditions in this case is payment of approximately $27,000 by the developers toward stoplight construction costs. (Beyond the cost of the installation of the stop light will be a need to further upgrade the twin lanes on Fish Road and the highway at the cost of approximately $540,000. The developers' 5 percent share is $27,000).Concerned community members have formed a group, People for Reasonable, Organized Urban Development (PROUD) to support the challenge of the MDNS.PROUD's goals are twofold: to stop the Freeland Exxon development, and to educate the public and local decision-makers, encouraging them to support sensible, planned growth in Island County.The Freeland Sub-Area Planning Group, whose appointed members have been working for 16 months to design Freeland's future growth, is in favor of a scenic view corridor for the highway through Freeland. Allowing this project to vest doesn't fit well with that concept, and certainly doesn't indicate much support for this group's work or vision by the county commissioners. For these reasons, some citizens, including PROUD members, are in favor of having a moratorium on future development (other than individual single family homes) to avoid foreclosing the planning options that this group is working on.Primary concerns raised by the public are:* Impact of sprawl-type development on our fragile island* Ugly urban sprawl; more visual blight on the highway* Potential damage to wetland system; violation of wetland ordinance* Potential for groundwater contamination from underground tanks and Quicklube petrochemicals, antifreeze, and other toxic fluids* Surface water runoff problems, including pollution of Puget Sound, increased drainage problems, and flooding* Increased traffic danger (there have been three fatalities at that intersection already this year)* Unnecessary competition for other local small businesses* Misuse of available land; loss of valuable wetland* No way to compensate for loss of rural character* This kind of development is Lynnwoodey, belongs on Highway 99, not Whidbey* Impacts to nearby heron rookery and other wildlifeWhere we are:WEAN, on behalf of PROUD, filed a notice of appeal with the Island County Hearing Examiner on May 23, 2000 in order to meet the deadline for citizen appeals. PROUD and WEAN hired attorney David Bricklin of Bricklin & Gendler, who will write the perfected appeal for the June 15 hearing in front of Hearing Examiner Michael Bobbink. If the hearing examiner rules against us -- that is, he doesn't remand the matter to the county and order that a Determination of Significance (DS) be issued for the project, which would trigger the requirement to prepare an environmental impact statement -- we will file an appeal in Island County Superior Court. Technically, the jurisdiction for rescinding the DNS for this project lies with the county's SEPA responsible official (Public Works Director Larry Kwarsick). The ultimate legal authority to protect the environment lies with the three county commissioners. If the county had complied with the Growth Management Hearings Board order to eliminate this area from the RAID by Nov. 30, this project would not have vested (would have been denied) because the application was filed Dec. 8, AFTER the county was supposed to comply. While the county continues to defy GMA, projects are vesting. The county has now been given until June 30 to remove areas from the RAID, and despite the fact that they can do that at any time, they are waiting until June 29.Please feel free to call me at 331-8876, or Jennifer Lail at 221-7838, with any questions.Jerry Hill, a member of PROUD, is lives in Freeland."

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