Whidbey Institute hires land coordinator, program assistant

The Whidbey Institute welcomes Maggie Mahle as land care coordinator in early April. The Whidbey Institute also welcomes Dan Mahle as program assistant.

Dan Mahle

The Whidbey Institute welcomes Maggie Mahle as land care coordinator in early April. Mahle will steward land activity including participating as a partner in the Learning from the Land Program, a nationwide leadership apprenticeship opportunity managed by Cary Peterson which includes Good Cheer and South Whidbey schools. Malhe will work with youth and volunteers in land projects using the Chinook land as a laboratory. Maggie Mahle

Mahle’s commitment to land stewardship brings her to the Whidbey Institute, according to a news release. Her background in biodynamics, wilderness leadership, permaculture and beekeeping enhances her work caring for the land and coordinating volunteers for projects in the Westgarden and on the Chinook land.

Mahle worked many years at Antioch College in Ohio leading a wilderness orientation program for incoming students. More recently she learned and taught about growing food and herbs in Boulder, Colo.

The Whidbey Institute also welcomes Dan Mahle as program assistant. Mahle recently moved from Seattle to Langley and works closely with Heather Johnson, associate director.

Mahle will assist in managing logistics and coordination for all programs and events at the Institute. According to a release, Mahle’s passion for youth leadership, intergenerational collaboration, program design, coordination and facilitation brought him to the work of the Institute. He will also support community outreach, youth engagement and volunteer development.

Mahle received his bachelor’s degree in peace and global studies from Earlham College in 2008. In addition to his work at the Institute, he serves as a facilitator and organizer with Generation Waking Up — a global campaign to ignite a generation of young people to bring forth a thriving, just and sustainable world.

Mahle said he feels deeply connected to the Chinook land, where he can often be found wandering through the woods.

 

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