4-H club members participate in 4-H Animal Dress-up Day at Island County Fairgrounds. (Photo provided)

4-H club members participate in 4-H Animal Dress-up Day at Island County Fairgrounds. (Photo provided)

4-H Rally Day emphasizes diverse activities club offers

‘It’s photography to fiber arts to electronics’

The nation’s largest youth development and mentoring organization is looking for some new members. The only requirement is being between the ages of 5 to 19.

Saturday is Rally Day for Island County’s 4-H Club, a time for kids and parents to find out more about the organization’s activities and goals.

From 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 13 at Bell’s Farm in Coupeville, information will be available along with a petting zoo and other family friendly pursuits.

Clubs with the logo of 4-H, which stands for Head, Heart, Hands and Health, are usually associated with pigs, horses and county fair competitions.

But 4-H is no longer just about farms and farming, said organizer George Lawson.

“It’s photography to fiber arts to electronics,” Lawson said. “There’s many possibilities. It’s the first time we’re doing something like this so people can get a ground level view of what 4-H is all about.”

The 4-H clubs of today focus on citizenship, healthy living, science, engineering and technology and animal science. Lawson and his wife, Vicki Lawson, oversee the 4-H clubs, Whidbey Island Hogs and Whidbey Shepherds.

Lawson encourages families from throughout Whidbey Island to attend Rally Day, which is aiming to be set up like a carnival.

“We’re trying to reach the north end and the south end,” he said.

Nationally, 4-H is affiliated with cooperative extension systems of 110 universities and the U.S. Department of Agriculture; some 6 million young people are enrolled in clubs across the country.

Engaging youth to reach their full potential by using a “learning by doing” model is its mission, according to its website.

Island County 4-H is coordinated by WSU Extension and overseen by a legion of volunteer adults who guide local clubs that focus on many kinds of animals, robotics and leadership.

Local clubs have names such as All American Puppy Paws, Rock ‘n Doodle Poultry, Artsy Animals (poultry, dogs crafts) Knight Riders (horses), Kool Kritters (cats, rabbits, guinea pigs) and Whidbey Island Homesteaders (goats).

In each club, participants can run for office, practice leadership roles, raise and manage the club’s money and pitch in with community service efforts.

Island County’s 4-H Teen Ambassadors is open to teens from seventh grade up. Youth improve communication skills, learn about leadership, prepare for college and/or a job and have opportunities to participate in many events around the state.

All adult volunteers undergo a background check, Lawson said.

Lawson is also a long-time volunteer with North Whidbey Fire and Rescue. The fire station plans to exhibit a new hands-on educational tool Saturday that teaches what to do in a burning house or building.

“It’s an actual training facility for kids,” he said.

Island County 4-H Rally Day; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 13 at Bell’s Farm, 892 W. Beach Road, Coupeville. Free. Learn about what local 4-H clubs do, enjoy family friendly events, such as a petting zoo, games and other activities.

As part of Saturday’s 4-H Rally Day, exhibits will be featured, such as the new Youth Safety Fire Training House of North Whidbey Fire and Rescue, sponsored by Rotary Club of Oak Harbor. The 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. event is at Bell’s Farm in Coupeville. (Photo provided)

As part of Saturday’s 4-H Rally Day, exhibits will be featured, such as the new Youth Safety Fire Training House of North Whidbey Fire and Rescue, sponsored by Rotary Club of Oak Harbor. The 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. event is at Bell’s Farm in Coupeville. (Photo provided)

More in Life

Whidbey Reads 2020 book focuses on gender identity

Don’t fret if you’re not ready for Whidbey Reads 2020. All five… Continue reading

Oak Harbor’s Roller Girls gliding into 10th year

There’s a somewhat of a juxtaposition in the actions on the floor… Continue reading

Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group
                                Lauren Flynn
Clinton musician finds her voice

Lauren Flynn isn’t afraid of a tough crowd. Or of much, really.… Continue reading

Losing weight, gaining perspective

For some, moving to Whidbey Island can be refreshing, rejuvenating and a… Continue reading

2020 Sea Float Scramble bigger than ever

Sea float seekers, get ready. Langley’s annual Sea Float Scramble will take… Continue reading

Farmers milking the opportunity to teach about goats

When it comes to goats, Clinton resident Anza Muenchow is not kidding… Continue reading

New preserve is born on Whidbey

By RON NEWBERRY Special to the Record As you step from the… Continue reading

Ring in the New Year where ever you are on the island

With New Year’s Eve approaching, there are several events and celebrations planned… Continue reading

‘Fantastic Beasts’ actor reported on South Whidbey

It’s unclear if any fantastic beasts have been set loose on South… Continue reading

Beth’s tasty 20-year road to success at bayleaf

I’m always intrigued by the fascinating, sometimes convoluted stories of how people… Continue reading

Christmas wishes

Kindergartners in Karyn LeWarne’s class at South Whidbey Elementary School answered these… Continue reading

Photos by Patricia Guthrie
                                Whidbey WaxWorks artisan and owner Prescilla Lowry sorts through her handmade candles.
Whidbey artist creates hand-made beeswax works of art to sell as holiday gifts

Heat, light, combustion. Such are the basic elements of a trendy holiday… Continue reading