Local businesses have stepped up so the Maxwelton Independence Day parade can take place for the 104th time on July 4. File photo

Local businesses have stepped up so the Maxwelton Independence Day parade can take place for the 104th time on July 4. File photo

Independence Day Parade marches on for Maxwelton

Business sponsors preserve the South Whidbey tradition

Maxwelton’s old-fashioned Fourth of July Parade will march on this year thanks primarily to its business sponsors, said organizer Harriet Arnold.

“We have had lots of questions about whether we would put it on this year,” said Arnold, part of the Maxwelton Community Club that hosts the event. “Because of our sponsors, Pickles Deli, Savage Printing, Clinton Food Mart and Jet Java, we are able to continue our parade tradition.”

Last year, the parade was almost cancelled because of the rising costs of pulling off the event.

Instead, organizers decided to cancel free van shuttles it had always provided to encourage people not to park along the parade route.

An online fundraising site then raised $6,140 so shuttle service was restored.

It’s being offered again at the intersection of Maxwelton and French roads, where free parking is provided at the Little Brown Church.

In its 104th year, Maxwelton Community Club’s most popular event will carry on the tradition of a charming parade that seems to be pulled off in record time but actually takes months of planning.

“Those of us on the committee spend all year planning and making sure everything goes off without a hitch,” Arnold said.

Registration starts at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, July 4, for those wanting to be in the parade.

The parade begins at noon sharp; about 200 entries and 2,000 people are expected.

Every year, the event also sponsors an art contest for children 14 and under to design a button that sells for a buck. Many people proudly wear their button collection to show their Maxwelton Independence Day loyalty.

More in Life

Find cheddar from another udder at these local dairy farms

St. John Creamery and Glendale Shepherd produce goat and sheep cheeses, respectively.

Doughnuts to please all palates, even pooches: Popular Bayview shop offers vegan option

Whidbey Doughnuts at Bayview Corner working on new creations

Photo by Wendy Leigh/South Whidbey Record
                                Rob Schouten welcomes one of the newest sculptures to the sculpture garden at Rob Schouten Gallery in Langley.
Sculpture garden comes alive in downtown Langley

To say “it’s been a long time coming” is an understatement for… Continue reading

Guide offers tips for ‘Hiking Close to Home

Washington state is known for its flannel-wearing, IPA-drinking, nature-loving residents, and Whidbey… Continue reading

A pressing need: Cider events proliferate as apple season begins

Autumn means a lot of things on Whidbey Island, but one that… Continue reading

Service dogs compete in ‘Puppy Olympics’ at volunteer picnic

With tails wagging and ears perked, eager canine “athletes” dashed and demonstrated… Continue reading

Premier gypsy jazz violinist and guitarist Christiaan van Hemert will lead four workshops at the DjangoFest NW in Langley. Photo courtesy of WICA.
Gypsy jazz workshops draw musicians to DjangoFest

When gypsy jazz sashays through Langley next week, it certainly won’t be… Continue reading

Whidbey Island Indivisible group joins banner march protesting immigration policy

Whidbey Island lies off the main drag stretching from the Canadian border… Continue reading

Shaquille Walker, youth advocate at Ryan’s House for Youth, helps clean the kitchen at the drop-in center.
Ryan’s House celebrates 10 years of helping youth

Youth homelessness might be a hidden problem in Island County, but there’s… Continue reading

Most Read