Exiting planner to get $17K, plus recommendation letter from mayor McCarthy

Langley will pay its former planning director more than $17,000 as part of a separation and severance package.

The Langley City Council recently accepted the resignation of city planning director Michael Davolio.

The Langley City Council recently accepted the resignation of city planning director Michael Davolio.

Langley will pay its former planning director more than $17,000 as part of a separation and severance package.

The city released the contract for former planning director Michael Davolio on Friday afternoon. Included are $11,909 equal to eight weeks of salary, $2,336 for 68 hours of accrued sick leave, $2,911 for two months of continued health, dental and vision coverage, $755.92 for remaining vacation leave, and $274.88 of accrued personal leave.

The deal also stipulates that the mayor write Davolio a recommendation letter for future employment.

The planning chief resigned Monday, Dec. 7 following more than a month of being off the job; he was placed on paid administrative leave Oct. 22, then unpaid administrative leave Nov. 16.

The city council accepted his resignation during Monday’s regular meeting. In his letter, a brief, one-paragraph statement said he resigned “for both personal and professional reasons.”

The council, after a 30-minute executive session with attorney Rosa Fruehling-Watson, also approved a separation agreement and severance. The Record’s request for a copy of the deal was denied Tuesday, with Mayor Fred McCarthy saying it would not be released for seven days due to a “recision” clause which allowed Davolio to consider the offer.

Government agencies are given five days to respond to a public records request, under the Public Records Act, with either the documents requested, a citation of the state code that allows an exemption, or an estimate of time to gather the documents.

If records are denied, cities must supply the state under which the records are exempt. There are no provisions that permit a delay. Although the city had already responded to the request, officials later said they would use the five days to process the request. The documents were released Friday at noon, a few hours before The Record goes to press.

Attempts to reach McCarthy for comment were unsuccessful.

 

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