Goosefoot gives out $88,000 to nonprofits

Ten Whidbey Island nonprofit organizations are the beneficiaries of Goosefoot Community Fund’s first official grant cycle.

Goosefoot awarded close to $88,000 in grants.

The Goosefoot Grants Program represents how the nonprofit organization will award money to other nonprofits in the future. It’s a step away from the case-by-case grant process previously adopted by the organization, and a move toward an organized cycle.

“This was a decision the new board made together,” Sandra Whiting, Goosefoot executive director, said. “We’ve given out a lot more than just those grants this year, but these grants are part of our first cycle.”

The grant cycle has been a goal for years, organization representatives say. Goosefoot intended to use profits from The Goose Grocer, which the organization operates, to funnel back into Whidbey’s nonprofit sector.

After years of operating the grocery store, profits are now large enough to give back.

“With profits continuing to grow, our board enthusiastically took up the work of establishing funding priorities and grant guidelines to give more structure to our charitable giving process,” Nadine Zackrisson, Goosefoot’s board president, said.

Whiting says the cycle will likely benefit smaller nonprofits in the end, as Goosefoot “will learn about organizations we didn’t know about.” Through the case-by-case process, organizations with larger reputations, such as Good Cheer, naturally had a leg up on the competition from name recognition.

Whiting added the cycle will most likely occur once a year, where nonprofits can apply through the grant process.

The recipients are Bayview Community Hall, Clinton Community Hall, Coupeville Farm to School, Friends of Friends Medical Support Fund, Good Cheer, Helping Hand, Mobile Turkey Unit, Sound Water Stewards, Whidbey Community Foundation and Whidbey Homeless Coalition.

More in News

Expert says chief followed right protocol

David Marks’ arrest of suspect ‘exactly what we teach’

Photos by Whidbey Camano Land Trust
                                Taylor Schmuki, left, and Kyle Ostermick-Durkee, both part of the Whidbey Camano Land Trust’s stewardship team, study the plant life this spring in a newly protected forest on South Whidbey.
Conservation Buyer Saves a Whidbey Island Forest

By RON NEWBERRY Special to the Record Pat Powell has worked with… Continue reading

Sailor shoots man, himself

A Navy man shot another man and then himself in Oak Harbor… Continue reading

Trooper, ranger try to prevent man from jumping off bridge

A trooper with the Washington State Patrol and a ranger with State… Continue reading

Valetta Faye will perform at Ott & Murphy Wines in Langley.
Singing sensation comes to South Whidbey

Singing is her passion, music is her soul. That’s singer Valetta Faye’s… Continue reading

Shhh…it’s a surprise party for old-timer Bill Lanning

Friends, customers invited to celebrate former owner of Bill’s Feed Tack

Retail sales grew in Island County, Langley

New numbers released by the state Department of Revenue show that Island… Continue reading

Hometown Heroes gets second book

Hometown Hero Book 2 is in the works. All money will go… Continue reading

Bayview Nights Car Show set

Safe Ride Home is holding the 2018 Cool Bayview Nights Car Show… Continue reading

Most Read