Presentation planned on long-term care bill

  • Friday, February 8, 2019 9:33pm
  • News

A Whidbey Island group is offering a presentation on a bill regarding long-term care, according to the Whidbey Island’s Puget Sound Advocates for Retirement Action committee.

House Bill 1087, the Long Term Care Trust Act, would make history, according to a press release.

The bill would establish a public long-term care trust fund through a monthly payroll fee of just over one half of one percent – 58 cents for every hundred dollars in income.

The legislation provides eligible recipients $100 a day for 365 days to help meet the cost of long-term care.

Advocates, working with a bi-partisan group of legislative co-sponsors, are helping to create a Social Security-type system for long-term care.

Most adults know someone that has needed long-term care services. Many families are unable to afford the cost of care without severe sacrifices, like “spending down” to become eligible for Medicaid or providing the needed services as family members, often at great financial and physical sacrifice, the press release states.

HB 1087 would give families the security of knowing that they or their loved ones will be able to access financial help for the care they need when they need it.

If passed, Washington will be the first state in the country to create a Social Security-type program for long-term care.

From 6:30-8 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12, at Langley United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall at 301 Anthes, the Whidbey Island’s Puget Sound Advocates for Retirement Action, or PSARA, committee will provide information on the legislation and what residents can do to help make it a law.

Presenters will include Kippi Waters, founding director of Peninsula Homecare Cooperative;Karen Richter, membership vice president of PSARA ; and Robby Stern, president of PSARA education fund.

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