Kyle Jensen / The Record                                Oasis for Animals owner Jean Favini holds a kitten who survived the fire. Favini has been treating the cats with diuretics and antibiotics.

Kyle Jensen / The Record Oasis for Animals owner Jean Favini holds a kitten who survived the fire. Favini has been treating the cats with diuretics and antibiotics.

Rescue owner risks fire to save cats

Nearly 20 cats owe another one of their nine lives to Oasis for Animals owner Jean Favini following a fire at the organization’s facility on Saturday.

The cat rescue organization owner defied the warnings of a 911 official and charged into a smoke-filled office with a towel around her face to save her meowing dependents. She made several trips into the building, returning each time with armloads of cats.

“All I cared about was the cats, so I said there was no way I wasn’t going to get them from the office,” Favini said. “I had to make a decision, and I’m so thankful I did. I’m just sad I didn’t go in sooner.”

She and a South Whidbey firefighter brought out all 24 cats in the building. Five did not survive, reportedly dying from smoke inhalation.

Oasis for Animals is a no-kill rescue organization that spays and neuters feral cats before putting them up for adoption. It’s located near Goss Lake.

The fire began at about 4:30 p.m. in the building next to her home. It’s an accessory dwelling unit that she’s converted for use as a shelter and Oasis’ headquarters. The blaze is believed to have been an electrical fire that started from a stove or microwave; neither were in use at the time. Flames were small and didn’t burn the entire office, instead claiming the appliances, damaging countertops and part of the wall.

Favini’s smoke detector failed to activate when the cat-filled room filled with smoke. She only realized there was a problem when she heard meowing from her driveway and then noticed smoke pouring from an outside vent.

“It was a relatively small fire, and it was out by the time we had gotten there,” Chief Rusty Palmer said. “A few cats perished from the smoke. Jean thinks one of the cats may have turned a stove burner on.”

Once Favini and firefighters grabbed all the cats by the scruff of their necks, she and firefighters attempted to resuscitate them. She said she tried “mouth to snout” to check if the soot-covered felines were breathing. One kitten had died by the time it was outside, and another died shortly after. Two had to be euthanized, and another didn’t make it through Sunday night.

“I thought we were going to lose them all,” Favini said. “My face, hands and hair were black, so I had to go to the hospital later to get tested for smoke inhalation.”

Although it paints a grim picture, Favini wore a large grin on her face when a Record reporter visited the site Monday afternoon due to the large portion saved from the smokey office. Although sneezes and kitty coughs could be heard at the other office space where the rescued cats were being held, Favini said they were showing signs of improvement. A couple of them ate for the first time during the reporter’s visit, and Favini said they were “finally acting like cats again.”

Soot could still be seen coming out of the cats’ mouths and noses.

Following the fire, Favini has been providing health care for the cats with the help of Robben Jones, the former owner of South Whidbey Animal Clinic. Jones has worked on the cats with Favini to give them antibiotics, the diuretic lasix and nebulize them to assist breathing. Jones received an OK from current clinic owner, Dr. Eric Patrin, to grab medications from the clinic to use. Patrin was off island.

“I used to be Jean’s vet years ago,” Jones said. “We set up an assembly line and got through treating them all eventually. I don’t do emergencies, but they were animals in need of help and that’s what I’m trained to do.”

Favini is using the incident to raise awareness about the importance of regularly updating fire detection devices. She hadn’t replaced the smoke detector in more than 10 years, which Palmer said is important to do. Favini also suggested unplugging devices that could spark at night, since it appears the fire was caused by an appliance.

Despite the potentially traumatic experience, Favini is in good spirits. With many of the cats’ health improving, she is finding the time to smile in the midst of the aftermath.

“It’s just great to see them bounce around in their cages again,” Favini said. “To see them playing again and closing their mouths when they breath makes me smile. I think I needed that.”

To help pay for the medical expenses, she is taking donations via the Oasis for Animals Paypal account.

Kyle Jensen / The Record                                A kitten with small amounts of soot on its nose and eye is held by Favini.

Kyle Jensen / The Record A kitten with small amounts of soot on its nose and eye is held by Favini.

Kyle Jensen / The Record                                A microwave is expected to be the cause of the fire. Favini says the microwave wasn’t being used when she noticed smoke coming from the building’s vent.

Kyle Jensen / The Record A microwave is expected to be the cause of the fire. Favini says the microwave wasn’t being used when she noticed smoke coming from the building’s vent.

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