Bells are ringing again at the Little Brown Church

The 100-year-old icon of the Maxwelton Valley is now home to Whidbey Bible Fellowship, a Bible study group of South End residents formed earlier this year.

  • Monday, March 28, 2011 11:21am
  • News
The new congregation gathers outside the Little Brown Church in Maxwelton.

The new congregation gathers outside the Little Brown Church in Maxwelton.

The Little Brown Church has its first congregation in more than six years.

The 100-year-old icon of the Maxwelton Valley is now home to Whidbey Bible Fellowship, a Bible study group of South End residents formed earlier this year.

The group meets at 10:30 a.m. in the community room of the church at Maxwelton and French roads.

Mary Jane Olson, one of the founders of WBF, said the group began with about a dozen regular members meeting at private homes, but has swelled to about 20 since services began at the church on March 6.

She said WBF is a New Testament church focusing on challenging expository Bible teaching and inspiring music.

Bible study is lead by Keith Wells of Freeland, who has years of teaching and pastoral experience, Olson said.

She said Wells has preached and taught in hundreds of churches throughout North and Central America and East Africa, but he began his ministry in the early 1970s, preaching and teaching in churches throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Olson said guest speakers will also be scheduled occasionally.

“Everybody’s welcome to come and try us out,” she said. “We expect to be doubling our group in short order, so people need to get in on the ground floor.”

The church was established in the early 1900s as Whidbey Island Free Methodist Church.

It served a number of congregations until 2006 before being put up for sale.

The church was bought by George and Lila Mills in 2008. He is a descendent of Maxwelton Valley pioneers.

The Millses refurbished the church and opened its facilities for community meetings and events. WBF is their first regular congregation.

“Everybody knows where it is, and a lot of people have been waiting to have services there again,” Olson said.

For information about WBF, call at 341-1776. For information about the Little Brown Church, call the Millses at 579-2007.

 

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