Knead & Feed closing doors after 45 years

This weekend is the final chance for residents to grab one of Knead & Feed’s famous orange rolls or cinnamon buns.

The family-run business of 45 years is shuttering after the Kroon brothers decided it’s time to move on to new adventures in life.

The bakery and restaurant — one above and other below in a historic Front Street building — has passed among hands in the family of seven siblings, including most recently to Doug, Jerry and Thom Kroon, after their sister Jeannette ran the business for over 30 years.

Already, the community has shown an outpouring of affection for the Knead & Feed owners, leaving messages on Facebook and signing posters at the bakery.

“We’ve had such a wonderful response from the community,” Doug Kroon said.

Over the years, the business offered many young people their first jobs.

“We’ve had generations of families that have worked for us,” Doug Kroon said.

The building is rife with memories for the Kroon siblings, who grew up working and running the business from a young age.

The building won’t be closed long. Lights will be back on and the doors reopened under the Little Red Hen Bakery name.

Oystercatcher and Little Red Hen Bakery owners Sara and Tyler Hansen said they will open the upstairs bakery in November, prior to Thanksgiving. They expect to open the larger downstairs space in February.

Sara Hansen said they want to offer the community a similar gathering place, preserving the cozy atmosphere of Knead & Feed.

“Good food, good price point. People like to have a good cup of coffee,” she said.

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