Nathan Gilles will discuss Northwest Native art this Thursday at the monthly meeting of Fishin’ Club Whidbey Island.(Photo provided)

Nathan Gilles will discuss Northwest Native art this Thursday at the monthly meeting of Fishin’ Club Whidbey Island.(Photo provided)

Fishin’ Club hooks members with a diversity of meetings

Northwest Native art to be discussed Thursday

The Fishin’ Club of Whidbey Island does more than just sit around bragging about the Big Catch or bemoaning The One That Got Away.

Monthly meetings highlight artists, cooks, recipes, educational talks and sometimes, fish and seafood — to eat. In October, the club launched its First Fish Film Festival.

Held the first Thursday of each month, the Fishin’ Club meets at M-Bar-C Ranch in Freeland.

It’s not to be confused with the Whidbey Island Fly Fishing Club where meetings sometimes involve sitting around tying funny-looking, colorful dangles onto sharp hooks.

“Our club meetings enjoy a wide variety of informative, interesting speakers covering local salt and fresh water fishing, fishing travel trips, crabbing techniques and equipment, cooking shellfish, boating, local history and environmental topics,” said Ken Price. “And, of course, our fun monthly raffle.”

The Fishin’ Club’s next gathering on Nov. 1 features artist Nathan Gilles, who’s billed as an artist/educator/historian.

Gilles will discuss Northwest Native art, particularly of the Coast Salish people. A non-native, Gilles became fascinated with indigenous art in the late 1980s and has been on a self-described quest “to learn, contemplate and perpetuate aspects of Northwest Coast aboriginal art and culture,” according to a press release.

Gilles will present a brief overview about how Salish native art from the Pacific Northwest differs from northern indigenous art from the region of Alaska and northern British Columbia.

Price said meetings are open to the public and he encouraged people to attend who are interested in seeing a presentation “about amazing art from our region.”

Fishin’ Club of Whidbey Island meets the first Thursday of every month at M-Bar-C Ranch, 5264 Shore Meadow Road (off Bush Point Road), Freeland. Social hour begins 7 p.m. For information see www.facebook.com/FishinClubofWhidbey/

Nathan Gilles will discuss Northwest Native art this Thursday at the monthly meeting of Fishin’ Club Whidbey Island. (Photo provided)

Nathan Gilles will discuss Northwest Native art this Thursday at the monthly meeting of Fishin’ Club Whidbey Island. (Photo provided)

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