Sorry anglers, no more chinook, state says

  • Wednesday, August 2, 2017 8:00am
  • News

Anglers in Marine Area 9, which covers Admiralty Inlet, can no longer retain chinook salmon, according to a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife announcement Friday.

Anglers are also limited to shoreline fishing in the area.

The changes were put into effect on Monday.

The department says the decision to prohibit chinook retention was made as the quota for the salmon was close to being met last week, the press release said. The department estimated the quota would be met by the end of Sunday.

“Preliminary estimates through Thursday indicate that anglers had caught 4,642 fish (83 percent) of the chinook quota of 5,599 fish for Marine Area 9,” the press release said. “The changes to the chinook fishery are in compliance with conservation objectives and agreed-to management plans.”

The decision to limit anglers to shoreline fishing in Admiralty Inlet was also put into effect at the same time on Monday. According to the press release, the action was made to “protect expected low runs of wild coho and pink salmon returning to the Skagit and Stillaguamish rivers.”

For more information on catch estimates and quotas for Marine Area 9, visit http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/reports_plants.html.

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