Photo courtesy of Rich Yukubousky                                A visitor admiring Abstract x4 on the night of the Dec. 6 gallery opening.

Photo courtesy of Rich Yukubousky A visitor admiring Abstract x4 on the night of the Dec. 6 gallery opening.

Abstract art show may be first of its kind on Whidbey

This month, the Front Room Gallery at the Bayview Cash Store features something different — abstract art.

The works of four artists are on display in Abstract x4, which may be the first entirely abstract art show on Whidbey Island. Many who came to the gallery show on its opening night said they were exposed to this style of the art for the first time; while they may not have understood it, they reported feeling emotional.

Artist Nancy Frances likes to make the comparison to hearing music.

“None of us are composers, but we all can feel something when we listen to music,” she said. “Abstract art can be the same way.”

And for her as the artist, creating abstract art is similar to an impromptu drive down the Oregon coast. She finds beauty in the uncertainty of not knowing where exactly she will end up.

Frances specializes in mixed media. Her pieces incorporate a range of materials, including watercolor, acrylic, oil, wax and graphite.

Words often serve as the impetus for her work. Her series in the Cash Store gallery is aptly titled “Diversity” and minimalistic in approach.

Since her exploration of abstract art began, Frances never looked back.

“I don’t see myself going back into realism art. Abstract art is so emotionally intuitive,” she said.

Her fellow abstract artist Barbara Mosher agreed.

“There’s no going back. It’s kind of like an addiction,” Mosher said.

Their show is hosted by the Goosefoot Community Fund.

Mosher, who formerly studied industrial design, finds herself using geometric shapes in her work.

“Abstract art lets me go wild. And I love color; color is my muse,” she said.

Her gallery series has to do with the trees outside her studio and the different light that affects them throughout the year.

When viewing abstract art, Mosher recommends not trying to make sense of it or to piece images together into something understandable.

“Abstract art is truly a creative process,” she said.

Mike Diamanti, one of the other displaying artists, captures climate change in a series of colorful panels and Kim Tinuviel displays close-up photography of Fort Casey.

A community canvas invites every gallery visitor’s contribution. At the end of December, it will be auctioned off and all proceeds will go to the Good Cheer Food Bank.

A panel discussion planned for 1 p.m., Dec. 28 will include an interactive question-and-answer session with the artists in the Front Room Gallery at the Bayview Cash Store.

Photo by Kira Erickson/Whidbey News Group                                A colorful piece of abstract art by Barbara Mosher.

Photo by Kira Erickson/Whidbey News Group A colorful piece of abstract art by Barbara Mosher.

More in Life

From left, Sarah Gallella, Jill Jackson and Erin Tombaugh take a sip of tea during their bows. (Photo by Karina Andrew/Whidbey News-Times)
Live theater returns to Whidbey Playhouse with three-woman show

The Playhouse’s first show of the long-awaited season will be “Tea for Three.”

Photo by Emily Gilbert/Whidbey News-Times
Cadesha Pacquette sets up a pop-up picnic spread similar to one she created for a young girl’s birthday party. Pacquette said her new venture has been popular with military families celebrating a spouse’s return from deployment, anniversaries or just to have fun outdoors.
Pop-up beach picnics are a popular way to celebrate coming home

Navy wife’s new business a big hit for deployments, anniversaries

Season of live entertainment planned for Whidbey Island Center for the Arts

After a year and a half of online events, WICA is planning a season of indoor, in-person events.

Karina Andrew/Whidbey News Group
Oak Harbor's famous chicken dances with the crowds at the Oak Harbor Music Festival Saturday. Ever the trendsetter, it appears a flock of fans have copied his signature pose while he struts about the town during the multi-day music festival.
Free-range fun

Oak Harbor’s famous Chucky Chicken danced with the crowds at the Oak… Continue reading

Photo provided by Ted Mihok
Whidbey Lions clubs provide medical supplies to Mexico

The Oak Harbor, Coupeville and Central Whidbey Lions Clubs’ influence extends far beyond the island.

A virus, a trial, a judgment coming to Whidbey Island Center for the Arts

A one-night reading of “The Trial of Doctor Fuchetti” is coming to the WICA main stage this Saturday.

See caption
A rare glimpse: Gates to sculpture park open to public for two days

The Cloudstone Sculpture Park will be open to the public from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 4 and 5.

Rockin’ a Hard Place: An irresistible urge to emerge takes hold, on and off the Rock

One of the benefits of this urge for me was recalling what I miss about our Rock while far from it.

Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record
Poultry-purchasing program now available at Organic Farm School

The school near Clinton is offering its stock of broilers for people to buy for a chicken dinner.

Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record
Dance troupe to meander ‘into the woods’

A contemporary dance company founded during the pandemic is planning its first show outdoors.

eg
Woodworking creations taking center stage at WICA Sept. 4-6

Whidbey’s biggest celebration of all things wooden is coming to the South End next weekend.

boy and mom
Wild experiences await at Possession Sound Preserve

The rugged site is the Whidbey Camano Land Trust’s newest nature preserve, which opened this summer.