Photo courtesy of Rich Yukubousky
                                A visitor admiring Abstract x4 on the night of the Dec. 6 gallery opening.

Photo courtesy of Rich Yukubousky A visitor admiring Abstract x4 on the night of the Dec. 6 gallery opening.

Abstract art show may be first of its kind on Whidbey

This month, the Front Room Gallery at the Bayview Cash Store features something different — abstract art.

The works of four artists are on display in Abstract x4, which may be the first entirely abstract art show on Whidbey Island. Many who came to the gallery show on its opening night said they were exposed to this style of the art for the first time; while they may not have understood it, they reported feeling emotional.

Artist Nancy Frances likes to make the comparison to hearing music.

“None of us are composers, but we all can feel something when we listen to music,” she said. “Abstract art can be the same way.”

And for her as the artist, creating abstract art is similar to an impromptu drive down the Oregon coast. She finds beauty in the uncertainty of not knowing where exactly she will end up.

Frances specializes in mixed media. Her pieces incorporate a range of materials, including watercolor, acrylic, oil, wax and graphite.

Words often serve as the impetus for her work. Her series in the Cash Store gallery is aptly titled “Diversity” and minimalistic in approach.

Since her exploration of abstract art began, Frances never looked back.

“I don’t see myself going back into realism art. Abstract art is so emotionally intuitive,” she said.

Her fellow abstract artist Barbara Mosher agreed.

“There’s no going back. It’s kind of like an addiction,” Mosher said.

Their show is hosted by the Goosefoot Community Fund.

Mosher, who formerly studied industrial design, finds herself using geometric shapes in her work.

“Abstract art lets me go wild. And I love color; color is my muse,” she said.

Her gallery series has to do with the trees outside her studio and the different light that affects them throughout the year.

When viewing abstract art, Mosher recommends not trying to make sense of it or to piece images together into something understandable.

“Abstract art is truly a creative process,” she said.

Mike Diamanti, one of the other displaying artists, captures climate change in a series of colorful panels and Kim Tinuviel displays close-up photography of Fort Casey.

A community canvas invites every gallery visitor’s contribution. At the end of December, it will be auctioned off and all proceeds will go to the Good Cheer Food Bank.

A panel discussion planned for 1 p.m., Dec. 28 will include an interactive question-and-answer session with the artists in the Front Room Gallery at the Bayview Cash Store.

Photo by Kira Erickson/Whidbey News Group
                                A colorful piece of abstract art by Barbara Mosher.

Photo by Kira Erickson/Whidbey News Group A colorful piece of abstract art by Barbara Mosher.

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