Bayview Community Hall may get an exterior makeover in the fall with a $25,000 matching contribution from Goosefoot and donations of supplies, equipment, time and labor from contractors and businesses. Donations from the public are still needed to make the dream a reality. Photo by Patricia Guthrie/Whidbey News Group

Bayview Community Hall may get an exterior makeover in the fall with a $25,000 matching contribution from Goosefoot and donations of supplies, equipment, time and labor from contractors and businesses. Donations from the public are still needed to make the dream a reality. Photo by Patricia Guthrie/Whidbey News Group

Bayview Hall ready for new fall coat

Goosefoot kicks in $25,000 toward exterior makeover

Bayview Community Hall may finally get a facelift at age 93.

Goosefoot announced it has awarded a $25,000 matching challenge grant toward the building’s “Paint the Hall” exterior project fund.

Bayview Community Hall has been at the center of South Whidbey’s social scene since 1927, hosting dances, weddings, movies, reunions and numerous other events. The hall is supported by the community through $10 membership fees, donations and rental fees.

More than a year ago, the hall launched a fundraising initiative to pay for the estimated $60,000 of work needed to remove lead paint, make small repairs and give the church-size building its first new coat of paint in decades.

“When the wind blows, it looks like it’s snowing, it’s flaking so bad in some places,” said hall board president Carie Elder.

Contrary to popular belief, the property isn’t owned by Goosefoot, which has offices across the street in the old Bayview School, she said.

“They own almost everything else in Bayview,” Elder said, “but not the hall and not Bayview Farm & Garden nursery.”

Goosefoot’s executive director, Sandy Whiting, called the community hall a “piece of living history that fits our vision and mission.”

“The Hall plays a significant role in the social and historic fabric of South Whidbey Island,” Whiting said.

Goosefoot’s offer includes matching all cash donations up to $15,000 and up to $10,000 in donated labor, supplies and equipment.

“It was a lovely surprise,” said Jill Yomnick, Bayview Community Hall board treasurer. “Goosefoot has been so unbelievably good to us.”

An online fundraising account has been set up to collect cash donations that will be matched dollar-for-dollar by Goosefoot up to $15,000.

“Whether you’re writing a check, donating eight hours of labor, or gallons of paint, your donation will be matched,” Yomnick said.

The biggest expense will be removing old lead-based paint.

“It has to be tented for the lead abatement,” Yomnick explained. “So it will be surrounded in scaffolding. They’ll tent it and wrap it completely to catch all the removed material.”

No events are scheduled during the last three weeks of September in anticipation of the ultimate work party involving hundreds of gallons of paint and volunteers of all ages and abilities.

Some two dozen contractors have volunteered to help prep the building for the paint job, repair badly worn sections and replace rotted window trim and doors. Whidbey Island businesses — Ace Hardware, Sebo’s, Hanson’s Building Supply and Black Diamond Rentals — have also stepped up and offered thousands of dollars in paint, plywood siding and equipment, Elder said.

— Donations may be made online at www.bayviewhall.org or by writing a check to Whidbey Community Hall Association and mailed to P.O. Box 1066, Langley, WA. 98260. All donations matched dollar-for-dollar up to $15,000 by Goosefoot.

— Be a part of the historic community hall for $10/year: www.bayviewhall.org

Bayview Community Hall board president Carie Elder checks spots where paint has flaked off over many years. Lead paint needs to be removed from the exterior of the nearly 100-year-old building before it’s repaired and painted. Photos by Patricia Guthrie/Whidbey News Group

Bayview Community Hall board president Carie Elder checks spots where paint has flaked off over many years. Lead paint needs to be removed from the exterior of the nearly 100-year-old building before it’s repaired and painted. Photos by Patricia Guthrie/Whidbey News Group

Bare spots of chipped off paint reveal the wood and construction of Bayview Community Hall, built in 1927.

Bare spots of chipped off paint reveal the wood and construction of Bayview Community Hall, built in 1927.

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