‘Giving tree’ presents chance to give to Whidbey nonprofits

As Whidbey Island residents set up Christmas trees in their living rooms this weekend, another holiday spruce lit up just in time for altruists to spread the holiday cheer.

The “giving tree” has returned for its 14th year, and offers a platform through which South Whidbey residents can donate to local nonprofits that serve the less-fortunate.

The giving tree, sponsored by Goosefoot, is decorated with ornaments handcrafted by the volunteers and staff of Whidbey nonprofits.

The ornaments are available to purchase, and all proceeds will be directed to the organization that handmade the ornament. A suggested minimum donation is set by the participating organizations.

Ornament prices range from $5 to $25, and purchases can be made through the end of December. Purchases must be made with cash or checks.

Credit and debit cards aren’t accepted.

“The ornaments make wonderful gifts, stocking stuffers, and are perfect items for clients, employees or gift exchange events,” according to a Goosefoot press release.

There are two giving trees located on South Whidbey. One is located at Island Athletic Club in Freeland, and another at the Bayview Cash Store. Visitors to the cash store can bring their selected ornaments to one of four shops in the building to purchase: Side Market, Salon Bella, Bloom’s Winery and Taproom at Bayview Corner.

This year’s participating nonprofits address a variety of issues ranging from food assistance to end-of-life care to family support services. Those involved include Whidbey Island Nourishes, Kids First, South Whidbey Children’s Center, WhidbeyHealth Foundation, Giraffe Heroes Project, Oasis for Animals, Equestrian Crossings, South Whidbey Tilth, Readiness to Learn Foundation and WAIF.

Call 360-321-4246 for information.

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