Summer delight: A scenic bike ride and a pie

Summer delight: A scenic bike ride and a pie

  • Tuesday, June 30, 2020 1:51pm
  • Life

Grab your bike helmet, it’s time to register for the fifth annual Sea, Trees, & Pie Bike Ride.

The fun and non-competitive bike ride, organized by the Whidbey Camano Land Trust, is taking a slightly new spin this summer.

Instead of registering for a one-day event you are invited to ride one of three scenic Central Whidbey courses when it fits your schedule between July 10 and Aug. 31.

Soak up the island’s natural beauty while supporting the Land Trust’s conservation work on Whidbey and Camano islands, then enjoy another treat: Registered riders will receive a voucher for a whole pie from Whidbey Pies.

Learn more and sign up for the bike ride at www.wclt.org/bikeride. Cost is $25 for a single rider and $40 for families. Children 16 and under ride for free. Helmets must be worn by all riders.

Proceeds from the event benefit the Whidbey Camano Land Trust, a nonprofit nature conservation organization that protects natural areas and working farms and provides public access to beaches and trails.

The bike ride showcases more than 30 properties permanently protected by the Land Trust. Crockett Lake, the island’s largest wetland system, is a prominent natural feature along all three routes.

Participants will enjoy riding through some of the island’s most breathtaking landscapes, including farmlands, beaches, wetlands, and woods with incredible views of the Olympic Mountains and Puget Sound. Riders may choose from three routes consisting of 5-, 10-, or 20-mile loops.

The 5-mile loop is over fairly level ground and is designed for both beginning and young bike riders.

The start and finish lines for all three routes is at the State Parks birding platform near the Coupeville/Port Townsend ferry terminal. A Discover Pass is required to park there. After you register, you’ll receive a packet of information, including a course map and the voucher for a pie.

Summer delight: A scenic bike ride and a pie

More in Life

Sherman, Phyllis
Rockin’ a Hard Place: A beautiful remembrance to heal a forgettable time

Each of us has that wonderful remembrance to treasure.

South Whidbey Homeless Coalition donation by Rotary
South Whidbey Rotary clubs donate to Homeless Coalition

Last Friday, the two Rotary Clubs on South Whidbey presented Executive Director… Continue reading

Whidbey writer’s hospice book released in paperback

Oak Harbor author Karen J. Clayton’s book, “Demystifying Hospice: Inside the Stories… Continue reading

Reading to dog
Therapy dogs go online

Reading with Rover pairs pooches with young readers

Annual Whidbey Gardening Workshop grows online this year

The island-wide gardening event is back this year after it was cancelled due to the pandemic.

Mead maker Jeremy Kyncl pours a tasting glass of Hawthorn Tulsi Mead, a blend of hawthorn berry and holy basil, in the new Whidbey tasting room of Hierophant Meadery. Photo by Kira Erickson/South Whidbey Record
From bluff to bluff: Meadery off to sweet start

Hierophant Meadery in Freeland features local honey in its sweet brews.

Currently identified as Sandy Point, this name has been given to many places on the shores of Washington State. The most historic one is on Whidbey Island, at the southwestern entrance to Saratoga Passage. It was the site of a centuries old permanent Snohomish Tribal Village and a major Potlatch Center. Its clam beds drew indigenous visitors as far away as the central coast and Snohomish River valley. Captain George Vancouver noted in his journals that Master Joseph Whidbey saw over 200 people at this site when his ship circumnavigated the Island in 1791. Photo provided.
Research project dives into South Whidbey history

A woman is asking for folks to help her with a research project exploring the years 1870-1940.

Untreated
Lead actress Shannyn Sossamon talks with filmmakers Andy Morehouse, left, and Nate Bell while filming "The House After Westerly". Photo by Wes Anthony/Firehouse Creative
Film featuring Whidbey free to view temporarily

“The Hour After Westerly” is free to view online until Jan. 17.

Susie Van
WI Drive helping to get the elderly, disabled where they need to go

A Langley woman gives rides to people in need in her new van named “Cookie.”

I Love You
Wendy’s manager shares the love one drive-thru customer at a time

April DiDonna tells Oak Harbor Wendy’s customers she cares.

Goodall arranges some food in the to-go window, where customers pick up their food from outside.
New cafe in town adapted to COVID world

Langley Kitchen has adapted to the times.

Artist Wayne Kangas, left, and Langley Arts Fund member Don Wodjenski install the Village by the Sea’s newest public art feature, a weather vane. Photo provided
Flying fish tells the weather

The Langley Arts Fund raised money for a new piece of public art in Clyde Alley.