Juggling duo Wren Schultz, left, and Della Moustachella take a stroll Thursday at the Whidbey Island Fair. Photos by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

Juggling duo Wren Schultz, left, and Della Moustachella take a stroll Thursday at the Whidbey Island Fair. Photos by Laura Guido/Whidbey News Group

Four days of fun: Whidbey fair has rides, animals, food, jugglers, Spider-man

It was sunshine and smiles for the Whidbey Island Fair’s opening day Thursday.

The fairgounds in Langley were crowded with families and fun-lovers of all ages who enjoyed wild carnival rides, bubbles, live music, agriculture and animals.

Youth from the 4-H clubs proudly showed off their furry companions and livestock to curious onlookers.

For Sammie Lapp, 9, the fair offered a chance to improve her skills and answer questions about the big-eyed dwarf Hotot rabbits she raised. It’s not eyeliner — this white bunny’s distinctive ring of black around each eye is a carefully selected trait. The rabbits hopped around in their cages as visitors meandered on by, ooh-ing and ahh-ing over the barn animals.

Learning about the bunnies of all breeds was a highlight of the fair, Jacque King of Freeland said.

“I think 4-H does a really good job,” she said.

Travis Peterson, 19, of the Clover 360 club, said he will miss being in 4-H. He leaves soon for Navy boot camp.

Mouse, Peterson’s black Angus, “walks nicely on a lead,” as declared on a name tag.

Other activities delighted guests with a chance to touch animals in the petting zoo, taste some local food and relax while listening to bands. Classic fair games, including the hammer-and-bell strength test, kept children entertained.

So did the heroes — Spider-man stayed busy, fist-bumping and posing for photos all day long.

“I love all the kids. It’s so much fun,” the masked hero said. “I could spend years here at the fair. …It’s definitely a nice change of pace from fighting crime.”

But don’t worry, “someone’s got to do it,” he said before rushing make some more children happy with a photo.

A full day of activities are planned for the fair, which runs through Sunday.

Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times                                Landon Hagen, 3, competes to pop a bubble first at the Whidbey Island Fair Thursday.

Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times Landon Hagen, 3, competes to pop a bubble first at the Whidbey Island Fair Thursday.

Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times                                Kyra Levit, 12, pets Theodore the suffolk hampshire sheep, at the Whidbey Island Fair Thursday. Levit is joined by Lilly Kline, 11.

Photo by Laura Guido/Whidbey News-Times Kyra Levit, 12, pets Theodore the suffolk hampshire sheep, at the Whidbey Island Fair Thursday. Levit is joined by Lilly Kline, 11.

Raja the tortoise attempts slow escape of the reptile area of the Whidbey Island Fair Thursday.

Raja the tortoise attempts slow escape of the reptile area of the Whidbey Island Fair Thursday.

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